2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166022
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High-Risk Sexual Behavior Communication of Teen Partners
Author(s):
Lock, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon Lock, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: sharon.lock@uky.edu
Abstract:
The specific aim of this study was to describe how males and females in late adolescence communicate with their sexual partners about high-risk sexual behaviors. A naturalistic approach was used to describe the communication process between male and female sexual partners. Participants were recruited from a university in the southeastern U.S. Criteria for inclusion were (1) male or female, 18 to 20 years old, (2) never pregnant or fathered a child, (3) never married, (4) spoke English, (5) had engaged in sexual intercourse. Interviews were designed to elicit information about communication between sexual partners about high-risk sexual behavior. Eighteen women and 15 men participated in the study. The majority of women (n=13) and men (n=11) were Caucasian. Three women were African American and two were Asian American. Four men were African American. Mean age was 18.94 years old for women and 19 years old for men. Participants were paid $10 after the interview was completed. Interviews with women were conducted by either the principal invesigator or a trained female research assistant. Interviews with men were conducted by a trained male research assistant. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim by an experienced transcriber. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Male and female transcripts were analyzed separately. For both men and women, building trust was identified as the core variable for communication about high risk sexual behavior. Building trust was defined as the process of developing confidence that the sexual partner is truthful about his or her sexual history. For women antecendents for building trust were nature of the relationship, length of the relationship, and indirect gathering of information. For men, antecendetns for building trust were nuture of the relationship, length of the relationship, and gut feelings. For women, one consequence of building trust was safe sex talk. Women were more likely to talk about high risk sexual behavior with their partner if they trusted him. For women, safe sex talk was influenced by alcohol use, previous sexual experiences, a proactive attitude, knowledge, talking with friends, and the media. Another consequence of building trust for women was unsafe sex practices. Many women perceived that they were in a monogamous relationship and decided it was safe to not use a condom. For men, the consequences of building trust was safe sex talk. For men, safe sex talk was influenced by a passive attitude. Men were willing to talk about high risk sexual behavior if the woman initiated the conversation, but often did not bring up the topic themselves. This study provides an understanding of the context of communication about high risk sexual behavior among teen partners. Findings of this study can serve as a guide for developing nursing strategies for promoting more effective communication about high risk sexual behavior among teen partners.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh-Risk Sexual Behavior Communication of Teen Partnersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLock, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon Lock, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia, School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: sharon.lock@uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166022-
dc.description.abstractThe specific aim of this study was to describe how males and females in late adolescence communicate with their sexual partners about high-risk sexual behaviors. A naturalistic approach was used to describe the communication process between male and female sexual partners. Participants were recruited from a university in the southeastern U.S. Criteria for inclusion were (1) male or female, 18 to 20 years old, (2) never pregnant or fathered a child, (3) never married, (4) spoke English, (5) had engaged in sexual intercourse. Interviews were designed to elicit information about communication between sexual partners about high-risk sexual behavior. Eighteen women and 15 men participated in the study. The majority of women (n=13) and men (n=11) were Caucasian. Three women were African American and two were Asian American. Four men were African American. Mean age was 18.94 years old for women and 19 years old for men. Participants were paid $10 after the interview was completed. Interviews with women were conducted by either the principal invesigator or a trained female research assistant. Interviews with men were conducted by a trained male research assistant. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim by an experienced transcriber. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Male and female transcripts were analyzed separately. For both men and women, building trust was identified as the core variable for communication about high risk sexual behavior. Building trust was defined as the process of developing confidence that the sexual partner is truthful about his or her sexual history. For women antecendents for building trust were nature of the relationship, length of the relationship, and indirect gathering of information. For men, antecendetns for building trust were nuture of the relationship, length of the relationship, and gut feelings. For women, one consequence of building trust was safe sex talk. Women were more likely to talk about high risk sexual behavior with their partner if they trusted him. For women, safe sex talk was influenced by alcohol use, previous sexual experiences, a proactive attitude, knowledge, talking with friends, and the media. Another consequence of building trust for women was unsafe sex practices. Many women perceived that they were in a monogamous relationship and decided it was safe to not use a condom. For men, the consequences of building trust was safe sex talk. For men, safe sex talk was influenced by a passive attitude. Men were willing to talk about high risk sexual behavior if the woman initiated the conversation, but often did not bring up the topic themselves. This study provides an understanding of the context of communication about high risk sexual behavior among teen partners. Findings of this study can serve as a guide for developing nursing strategies for promoting more effective communication about high risk sexual behavior among teen partners.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:36Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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