Influence of Health Perceptions and Hope on Selected Reproductive HealthBehaviors in Late Adolescent Males

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166024
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of Health Perceptions and Hope on Selected Reproductive HealthBehaviors in Late Adolescent Males
Author(s):
Fuller, Sara
Author Details:
Sara Fuller, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: sara.fuller@sc.edu
Abstract:
Health promotion for late adolescent males is a needed but neglected area of nursing research. Late adolescent (ages 18-21) is a period of transition from family dependence and responsibility to independece and self-responsiblity. The reproductive health of young men is of particular importance since they are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, injury, premature parenthood, and testicular cancer: all of which are amenable to prevention and early detection programs. Using the Kersell/Milsum model of behavioral change, this study assessed the influence of general health perception and hope on the practice of positive health care practices in men's reproductive health in late adolescent males. Selected at random from the Department of Motor Vehicles roster of licensed drivers in a southeastern state, 360 volunteer subjects were stratified by age (18-19 & 20-21) with 180 subjects per age grouping. As part of a larger survey project, each subject responded to a mailed survey which included Ware's General Health Perceptions Scale (GHPS), the Miller Hope Scale (MHS), and the Men's Reproductive Health Inventory (MHRI) as well as other instruments. Each subject received $25 for participating in the survey. Findings to be presented include the reliability of the study instruments in this population, demographic characteristics of the sample, regression analyses of the GHPS and MHS on the MRHI, and the effectiveness of the mailed survey with inducement in late adolescent males. Discussion will include implications for development of health promotion programs for late adolescent males and the use of the Kersell/Milsum model of behavioral change.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluence of Health Perceptions and Hope on Selected Reproductive HealthBehaviors in Late Adolescent Malesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Saraen_US
dc.author.detailsSara Fuller, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: sara.fuller@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166024-
dc.description.abstractHealth promotion for late adolescent males is a needed but neglected area of nursing research. Late adolescent (ages 18-21) is a period of transition from family dependence and responsibility to independece and self-responsiblity. The reproductive health of young men is of particular importance since they are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, injury, premature parenthood, and testicular cancer: all of which are amenable to prevention and early detection programs. Using the Kersell/Milsum model of behavioral change, this study assessed the influence of general health perception and hope on the practice of positive health care practices in men's reproductive health in late adolescent males. Selected at random from the Department of Motor Vehicles roster of licensed drivers in a southeastern state, 360 volunteer subjects were stratified by age (18-19 & 20-21) with 180 subjects per age grouping. As part of a larger survey project, each subject responded to a mailed survey which included Ware's General Health Perceptions Scale (GHPS), the Miller Hope Scale (MHS), and the Men's Reproductive Health Inventory (MHRI) as well as other instruments. Each subject received $25 for participating in the survey. Findings to be presented include the reliability of the study instruments in this population, demographic characteristics of the sample, regression analyses of the GHPS and MHS on the MRHI, and the effectiveness of the mailed survey with inducement in late adolescent males. Discussion will include implications for development of health promotion programs for late adolescent males and the use of the Kersell/Milsum model of behavioral change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:38Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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