2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166025
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Cognitive Determinants of Abstinence in College Students
Author(s):
Dilorio, Colleen
Author Details:
Colleen DiIorio, PhD, Associate Professor, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: cdiiori@emory.edu
Abstract:
The specific aim of this study was to determine characteristics which distinguish abstinent from nonabstinent college students. Data were collected from students at 6 colleges/universities in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Names of students were randomly selected from registrar lists, and the selected students were sent a questionnaire to complete. Measures were derived from social cognitive theory and included knowledge of AIDS and safer sex practices, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, personal goals, perceived vulnerability and parental communication. A total of 2,069 students returned completed questionnaire. The majority of respondents were female (61.9%); 49.1% were white, 38.9% black, 6.7% asian, and 5.4% of other ethnic backgrounds. There was an approximately equal distribution of freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Preliminary analysis reveals that several social cognitive variables including general and sex-based communication with parents, self-evaluative outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, alcohol use, and perceived vulnerability were instrumental in differentiating sexually active from non-sexually active participants. The findings have implications for HIV prevention education for college students.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Cognitive Determinants of Abstinence in College Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDilorio, Colleenen_US
dc.author.detailsColleen DiIorio, PhD, Associate Professor, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: cdiiori@emory.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166025-
dc.description.abstractThe specific aim of this study was to determine characteristics which distinguish abstinent from nonabstinent college students. Data were collected from students at 6 colleges/universities in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Names of students were randomly selected from registrar lists, and the selected students were sent a questionnaire to complete. Measures were derived from social cognitive theory and included knowledge of AIDS and safer sex practices, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, personal goals, perceived vulnerability and parental communication. A total of 2,069 students returned completed questionnaire. The majority of respondents were female (61.9%); 49.1% were white, 38.9% black, 6.7% asian, and 5.4% of other ethnic backgrounds. There was an approximately equal distribution of freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Preliminary analysis reveals that several social cognitive variables including general and sex-based communication with parents, self-evaluative outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, alcohol use, and perceived vulnerability were instrumental in differentiating sexually active from non-sexually active participants. The findings have implications for HIV prevention education for college students.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:40Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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