2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166026
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Treatment decision making by parents of pediatric oncology patients
Author(s):
Oakes, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Oakes, MSN, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: linda.oakes@stjude.org
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: To better define the treatment-related decisions considered most difficult by parents of pediatric patients with cancer and the factors that influenced their final decisions. Design: Retrospective-descriptive design. Setting: Pediatric oncology institution in the midsouthern region of the United States. Sample: 39 parents representing 37 of 83 eligible families, 16 attending physicians, three nurses, and two chaplains. Methods: Parent participants responded by telephone to six open-ended interview questions and a 15-item questionnaire about factors that were important when making the decision to continue care. Healthcare professionals were interviewed face-to-face. Main Research Variables: Most difficult treatment-related decisions; factors influencing decision making. Findings: Parents reported 15 types of difficult decisions, the majority of which were made late in the course of treatment. Deciding between a phase I drug study or no further treatment (n=14), maintaining or withdrawing life support (n=11), and give more chemotherapy or giving no further treatment (n=8) were the most frequently reported difficult decisions. Parents rated "recommendations received from healthcare professionals" as the questionnaire factor most important in their decision making, and healthcare professionals rated "discussion with the family of the patient" as the most important factor. Conclusion: Parents of children or adolescents with cancer and their healthcare providers face difficult treatment-related decisions, many of which occur late in the course of treatment. Parents and healthcare professionals cite similar factors in their decision making but differ in their ratings of the factors' importance. For parents, the information and recommendations they receive from healthcare professionals figure most frequently and most importantly in their decision making. For healthcare professionals, the certainty that the patient will not get better and discussions with the patient's family figure most importantly in their decision making. Once parents conclude that their child can not get better, they are more likely to choose non-curative options such as choosing no further treatment or withdrawing life support. Implications for Nursing Practice: Nurses can help determine what information parents need in their decision making. Particular attention must be given to ways to communicate the likelihood of their child's survival.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTreatment decision making by parents of pediatric oncology patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOakes, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Oakes, MSN, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: linda.oakes@stjude.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166026-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: To better define the treatment-related decisions considered most difficult by parents of pediatric patients with cancer and the factors that influenced their final decisions. Design: Retrospective-descriptive design. Setting: Pediatric oncology institution in the midsouthern region of the United States. Sample: 39 parents representing 37 of 83 eligible families, 16 attending physicians, three nurses, and two chaplains. Methods: Parent participants responded by telephone to six open-ended interview questions and a 15-item questionnaire about factors that were important when making the decision to continue care. Healthcare professionals were interviewed face-to-face. Main Research Variables: Most difficult treatment-related decisions; factors influencing decision making. Findings: Parents reported 15 types of difficult decisions, the majority of which were made late in the course of treatment. Deciding between a phase I drug study or no further treatment (n=14), maintaining or withdrawing life support (n=11), and give more chemotherapy or giving no further treatment (n=8) were the most frequently reported difficult decisions. Parents rated "recommendations received from healthcare professionals" as the questionnaire factor most important in their decision making, and healthcare professionals rated "discussion with the family of the patient" as the most important factor. Conclusion: Parents of children or adolescents with cancer and their healthcare providers face difficult treatment-related decisions, many of which occur late in the course of treatment. Parents and healthcare professionals cite similar factors in their decision making but differ in their ratings of the factors' importance. For parents, the information and recommendations they receive from healthcare professionals figure most frequently and most importantly in their decision making. For healthcare professionals, the certainty that the patient will not get better and discussions with the patient's family figure most importantly in their decision making. Once parents conclude that their child can not get better, they are more likely to choose non-curative options such as choosing no further treatment or withdrawing life support. Implications for Nursing Practice: Nurses can help determine what information parents need in their decision making. Particular attention must be given to ways to communicate the likelihood of their child's survival.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:41Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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