The Possibilities and the Pitfalls of Doing a Secondary Analysis of a QualitativeData Set

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166028
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Possibilities and the Pitfalls of Doing a Secondary Analysis of a QualitativeData Set
Author(s):
Hinds, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Hinds, PhD, Coordinator Nursing Research, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: pshinds@childrensnational.org
Abstract:
Secondary analysis is the use of an existing data set to find answers to a research question that differs from the question asked in the original or primary study. Secondary analyses of quantitative data sets (such as national census track surveys) is a respected, common, and cost-effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of the collected data (Cherlin, 1991; Gleit & Graham, 1989; Lobo, 1986). In contrast, secondary analysis of qualitative data sets has not been an accepted approach (Thorne, 1993) because of concerns about the appropriateness of qualitative methods and their resulting data for such use, including the need for a close relationship between the researcher and the data. If these legitimate concerns can be adequately addressed, descriptively rich qualitative data sets that will be underutilized could become important sources of information. The major challenges include determining the exact research question that can be validly and accurately asked of an existing qualitative data set, assessing the quality of the data set, determining and comparing the nature of the concepts of interest in the primary and secondary analyses, adequately sensitizing the researchers conducting the secondary analysis to the context of the primary study, and providing debriefing experiences for researchers conducting the secondary analysis. A major pitfall is the use of research questions that are broad in scope and abstract at the conceptual level. Although that kind of research question is appropriate for a primary qualitative study, more defined, limited, and specified research questions work best in a secondary analysis of a qualitative data set. A related pitfall is not first determining what can be asked of the data set. Once the research question has been determined, the researcher must then assess whether the question is substantial enough to merit the efforts of the secondary analysis. Another pitfall is the use of an established framework for analytical purposes. Using the established framework may contribute to difficult or unsolvable issues about the primary study design, method, or the framework itself. Instead, using an inductive, analytic approach is more likely to yield reliable and valid findings from a secondary analysis. An additional difficulty is the ethical dilemma of using a data set for a purpose other than what the participants in the primary study gave consent. The benefits of conducting a secondary analysis of a qualitative data set include the opportunities to 1) discover new information about a phenomenon or process that might not have resulted from a direct inquiry, and 2) extend or validate findings from the primary study. These benefits may be achieved without the costs of conducting a labor-intensive, time consuming qualitative study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Possibilities and the Pitfalls of Doing a Secondary Analysis of a QualitativeData Seten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHinds, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Hinds, PhD, Coordinator Nursing Research, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: pshinds@childrensnational.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166028-
dc.description.abstractSecondary analysis is the use of an existing data set to find answers to a research question that differs from the question asked in the original or primary study. Secondary analyses of quantitative data sets (such as national census track surveys) is a respected, common, and cost-effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of the collected data (Cherlin, 1991; Gleit & Graham, 1989; Lobo, 1986). In contrast, secondary analysis of qualitative data sets has not been an accepted approach (Thorne, 1993) because of concerns about the appropriateness of qualitative methods and their resulting data for such use, including the need for a close relationship between the researcher and the data. If these legitimate concerns can be adequately addressed, descriptively rich qualitative data sets that will be underutilized could become important sources of information. The major challenges include determining the exact research question that can be validly and accurately asked of an existing qualitative data set, assessing the quality of the data set, determining and comparing the nature of the concepts of interest in the primary and secondary analyses, adequately sensitizing the researchers conducting the secondary analysis to the context of the primary study, and providing debriefing experiences for researchers conducting the secondary analysis. A major pitfall is the use of research questions that are broad in scope and abstract at the conceptual level. Although that kind of research question is appropriate for a primary qualitative study, more defined, limited, and specified research questions work best in a secondary analysis of a qualitative data set. A related pitfall is not first determining what can be asked of the data set. Once the research question has been determined, the researcher must then assess whether the question is substantial enough to merit the efforts of the secondary analysis. Another pitfall is the use of an established framework for analytical purposes. Using the established framework may contribute to difficult or unsolvable issues about the primary study design, method, or the framework itself. Instead, using an inductive, analytic approach is more likely to yield reliable and valid findings from a secondary analysis. An additional difficulty is the ethical dilemma of using a data set for a purpose other than what the participants in the primary study gave consent. The benefits of conducting a secondary analysis of a qualitative data set include the opportunities to 1) discover new information about a phenomenon or process that might not have resulted from a direct inquiry, and 2) extend or validate findings from the primary study. These benefits may be achieved without the costs of conducting a labor-intensive, time consuming qualitative study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:44Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.