2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166030
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Participation in Free Prostate Cancer Screening
Author(s):
Tingen, Martha
Author Details:
Martha Tingen, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Prevention Institute, Augusta, Georgia, United States, email: mtingen@mcg.edu
Abstract:
Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men. The incidence of prostate cancer has increased dramatically over the last 10 years by 50%. It is estimated that in 1995, there will be 244,000 new cases of prostate cancer in the United States. Additionally, estimates of prostate cancer deaths will be 40,400. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational research was to investigate the relationship among selected demographic factors and participation in free prostate cancer screening. A conceptual map, representing an amalgamation of key constructs from multiple models was developed and provided the framework for this research. A randomly selected sample of 249 men, ages 40-70, were recruited from churches, barbershops and senior centers in a southeastern state. Data on demographic factors was obtained using the Prostate Cancer Project Questionnalre. Participation in prostate cancer screening was measured by complying with the American Cancer Society's Guidelines, which included having a digital rectal exam (DRE) and/or a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, chi-square test of independence and logistic regression. The average participant was African-American, X = 53.7 years, a high school graduate and earned between $9,601 to $25,020 per year. Predictors of participation in free prostate cancer screening were race, age and income. For race, white men, on average, were more likely to participate in free prostate cancer screening than African-American men (*p < 0.05). Related to age, older men, 60-70 years old, were on average, more likely to participate in free prostate cancer screening than younger men (*p < 0.05). Specific to income, men whose annual income was > $50,000 were more likely to participate in free screening than those who earned between $25,021-$49,999 (*p < 0.05). Implications of these findings for theoretical and practical perspectives will be presented. Additionally, recommendations for future research will be identified.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Participation in Free Prostate Cancer Screeningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTingen, Marthaen_US
dc.author.detailsMartha Tingen, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Prevention Institute, Augusta, Georgia, United States, email: mtingen@mcg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166030-
dc.description.abstractProstate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men. The incidence of prostate cancer has increased dramatically over the last 10 years by 50%. It is estimated that in 1995, there will be 244,000 new cases of prostate cancer in the United States. Additionally, estimates of prostate cancer deaths will be 40,400. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational research was to investigate the relationship among selected demographic factors and participation in free prostate cancer screening. A conceptual map, representing an amalgamation of key constructs from multiple models was developed and provided the framework for this research. A randomly selected sample of 249 men, ages 40-70, were recruited from churches, barbershops and senior centers in a southeastern state. Data on demographic factors was obtained using the Prostate Cancer Project Questionnalre. Participation in prostate cancer screening was measured by complying with the American Cancer Society's Guidelines, which included having a digital rectal exam (DRE) and/or a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, chi-square test of independence and logistic regression. The average participant was African-American, X = 53.7 years, a high school graduate and earned between $9,601 to $25,020 per year. Predictors of participation in free prostate cancer screening were race, age and income. For race, white men, on average, were more likely to participate in free prostate cancer screening than African-American men (*p < 0.05). Related to age, older men, 60-70 years old, were on average, more likely to participate in free prostate cancer screening than younger men (*p < 0.05). Specific to income, men whose annual income was > $50,000 were more likely to participate in free screening than those who earned between $25,021-$49,999 (*p < 0.05). Implications of these findings for theoretical and practical perspectives will be presented. Additionally, recommendations for future research will be identified.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:46Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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