The Effect of a Relaxation With Guided Imagery Nursing Intervention on BreastCancer Patients' Stress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166032
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Relaxation With Guided Imagery Nursing Intervention on BreastCancer Patients' Stress
Author(s):
Gross, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Gross, PhD, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: sgross@hsc.wvu.edu
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To test the effect of a nursing intervention employing relaxation with guided imagery on perceived stress in a clinical trial with breast cancer patients. To describe patient characteristics that promoted or inhibited the use of relaxation with guided imagery as a nursing intervention with this patient population. Hypothesis: Women with breast cancer who received standardized cancer care instruction and a planned relaxation with guided imagery program (CCI + RGI) would exhibit less stress during an eight-week chemotherapy regimen than would women who received standardized cancer care instruction (CCI) only. Subjects: 30 white women predominately from rural Appalachia, age 30 to 67, who were naive to chemotherapy and were beginning treatment with combination chemotherapy 3 to 8 weeks post surgery for Stage I or Stage II breast cancer. Methods: A prospective, experimental, repeated measures design was used to determine differences in stress levels over 8 weeks' time for women randomized to experimental condition of CCI + RGI versus women randomized to control condition of CCI only. Patients received RGI and/or CCI throughout the study period. RGI was by audio tape authored and recorded by the investigator. CCI, from nursing protocols developed for this study, was given weekly as needed during scheduled telephone contact with each patient. Measures of stress included Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, and the Stanford Inventory of Cancer Patient Adjustment. Baseline measurement and initial treatment session were completed prior to the start of day 1, cycle 1 of chemotherapy. Midpoint and endpoint measurement was done in the fifth and ninth weeks, respectively. Data analysis was by repeated measures ANOVA. Findings: There was a significant Group by Time interaction for the subscale Coping with Medical Procedures, F(2,56) = 4.00, p = .02. Patients perceived RGI to be of benefit as a help to cope. Reported frequency of RGI use ranged from 21 to 112 with a mean of 71. The oldest patients reported less use. The most common reasons reported by experimental condition patients for less than twice a day use were "too sick to concentrate" and "too busy." Two patients reported the cancer ideation contained in the RGI script was threatening. Implications: RGI by audio tape was a simple nursing intervention easily used with this patient population. The findings offer limited support for the hypothesis and suggest five areas of future research. Two direct clinical application recommendations for improved nursing practice are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Relaxation With Guided Imagery Nursing Intervention on BreastCancer Patients' Stressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGross, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Gross, PhD, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: sgross@hsc.wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166032-
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To test the effect of a nursing intervention employing relaxation with guided imagery on perceived stress in a clinical trial with breast cancer patients. To describe patient characteristics that promoted or inhibited the use of relaxation with guided imagery as a nursing intervention with this patient population. Hypothesis: Women with breast cancer who received standardized cancer care instruction and a planned relaxation with guided imagery program (CCI + RGI) would exhibit less stress during an eight-week chemotherapy regimen than would women who received standardized cancer care instruction (CCI) only. Subjects: 30 white women predominately from rural Appalachia, age 30 to 67, who were naive to chemotherapy and were beginning treatment with combination chemotherapy 3 to 8 weeks post surgery for Stage I or Stage II breast cancer. Methods: A prospective, experimental, repeated measures design was used to determine differences in stress levels over 8 weeks' time for women randomized to experimental condition of CCI + RGI versus women randomized to control condition of CCI only. Patients received RGI and/or CCI throughout the study period. RGI was by audio tape authored and recorded by the investigator. CCI, from nursing protocols developed for this study, was given weekly as needed during scheduled telephone contact with each patient. Measures of stress included Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, and the Stanford Inventory of Cancer Patient Adjustment. Baseline measurement and initial treatment session were completed prior to the start of day 1, cycle 1 of chemotherapy. Midpoint and endpoint measurement was done in the fifth and ninth weeks, respectively. Data analysis was by repeated measures ANOVA. Findings: There was a significant Group by Time interaction for the subscale Coping with Medical Procedures, F(2,56) = 4.00, p = .02. Patients perceived RGI to be of benefit as a help to cope. Reported frequency of RGI use ranged from 21 to 112 with a mean of 71. The oldest patients reported less use. The most common reasons reported by experimental condition patients for less than twice a day use were "too sick to concentrate" and "too busy." Two patients reported the cancer ideation contained in the RGI script was threatening. Implications: RGI by audio tape was a simple nursing intervention easily used with this patient population. The findings offer limited support for the hypothesis and suggest five areas of future research. Two direct clinical application recommendations for improved nursing practice are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:49Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.