2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166033
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Socialization and Distance Learning Programs
Author(s):
Reinert, Bonita
Author Details:
Bonita Reinert, PhD, Associate Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Bonita.Reinert@usm.edu
Abstract:
According to a recent survey, 135 schools (38%) of the members of AACN currently offer some form of distance learning classes. A total of 75 schools offer graduate coursework. According to additional findings from that survey, the number of graduate distance learning programs have increased of 837% in the last ten years. Despite the increased numbers of off-campus graduate programs, however, little research has been conducted to study socialization in off-campus programs. Since graduate distance learning programs prepare future leaders and educators, it is critical that we understand, plan for, and evaluate the socialization process. The purpose of this study was to examine the concept of socialization from the perspective of schools offering graduate distance learning classes. The study was descriptive in nature. An introductory letter, questionnaire, and stamped, self-addressed envelope were mailed to the Deans of AACN member schools which offer distance learning graduate courses. The questionnaire used in the study was developed by the researcher and consisted of eight open-ended questions. Informants were asked to discuss the components of socialization, how to facilitate socialization, how to measure the presence of socialization, and how to insure socialization occurs in distance learning programs. Thirty-five schools (45%) returned their questionnaires. Responses for each of the questions were examined using content analysis. The framework that guided the initial analysis was the Stages of Professional Socialization Model developed by Corcoran & Shirley (1988). Preliminary analysis identified the following components of socialization: identification with the profession, identification of self as an APN, identification with a practice model, and adoption of a theoretical and research base for their practice. Categories of strategies to facilitate socialization included both formal and informal interactions designed to help the student develop an inquiring mind and a personal practice model. Eighteen schools (64%) mentioned concerns about socialization and distance learning programs. Twelve schools (34%) had students come to campus for planned events as a way to address socialization needs. Many respondents were unsure how to measure socialization. The most common responses included student satisfaction, faculty evaluation, and professional behaviors following graduation. According to Corcoran & Shirley and data from this study, graduate students must be exposed to essential resources, as well as informal and formal interactions with peers and successful role models to insure profession socialization. Those needs are especially difficult to meet when students complete entire degrees at off-campus sites. Based on findings from this study, more understanding and planning is needed to insure socialization occurs in graduate nursing distance learning programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocialization and Distance Learning Programsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReinert, Bonitaen_US
dc.author.detailsBonita Reinert, PhD, Associate Professor, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Bonita.Reinert@usm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166033-
dc.description.abstractAccording to a recent survey, 135 schools (38%) of the members of AACN currently offer some form of distance learning classes. A total of 75 schools offer graduate coursework. According to additional findings from that survey, the number of graduate distance learning programs have increased of 837% in the last ten years. Despite the increased numbers of off-campus graduate programs, however, little research has been conducted to study socialization in off-campus programs. Since graduate distance learning programs prepare future leaders and educators, it is critical that we understand, plan for, and evaluate the socialization process. The purpose of this study was to examine the concept of socialization from the perspective of schools offering graduate distance learning classes. The study was descriptive in nature. An introductory letter, questionnaire, and stamped, self-addressed envelope were mailed to the Deans of AACN member schools which offer distance learning graduate courses. The questionnaire used in the study was developed by the researcher and consisted of eight open-ended questions. Informants were asked to discuss the components of socialization, how to facilitate socialization, how to measure the presence of socialization, and how to insure socialization occurs in distance learning programs. Thirty-five schools (45%) returned their questionnaires. Responses for each of the questions were examined using content analysis. The framework that guided the initial analysis was the Stages of Professional Socialization Model developed by Corcoran & Shirley (1988). Preliminary analysis identified the following components of socialization: identification with the profession, identification of self as an APN, identification with a practice model, and adoption of a theoretical and research base for their practice. Categories of strategies to facilitate socialization included both formal and informal interactions designed to help the student develop an inquiring mind and a personal practice model. Eighteen schools (64%) mentioned concerns about socialization and distance learning programs. Twelve schools (34%) had students come to campus for planned events as a way to address socialization needs. Many respondents were unsure how to measure socialization. The most common responses included student satisfaction, faculty evaluation, and professional behaviors following graduation. According to Corcoran & Shirley and data from this study, graduate students must be exposed to essential resources, as well as informal and formal interactions with peers and successful role models to insure profession socialization. Those needs are especially difficult to meet when students complete entire degrees at off-campus sites. Based on findings from this study, more understanding and planning is needed to insure socialization occurs in graduate nursing distance learning programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:50Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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