2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166035
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovation and excellence: The army school of nursing
Author(s):
Bryant, Celia
Author Details:
Celia Bryant, PhD, Associate Professor, Western Kentucky University, Department of Nursing, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA, email: sue.bryant@wku.edu
Abstract:
Of international proportions created an immediate demand for trained nurses to care for civilians at home as well as soldiers at home and abroad. Numerous proposals were advanced for solving the problem of supplying nursing personnel including increased enrollments in nurse training schools, decreased length of training, Red Cross trained nurse's aids, the training of college graduates as nurses (Vassar Plan), and an Army School of Nursing (ASN). The purpose of this presentation is to describe those factors that influenced the development of the Army School of Nursing in 1918, its contributions to nursing education, the reasons for its survival long after the war was over, and the factors that brought about its abrupt demise. Proposed by a group of leaders in nursing education, women of exceptional education were to be prepared as nurses in army training camps during war. Innovative educational approaches were inaugurated and the school quickly earned a reputation as an outstanding educational institution. Although the school did not meet its original objectives of providing sufficient numbers of nurses for the war effort, it was deemed a success because it demonstrated the possibility of developing a well-established school and the likelihood of rapidly expanding nursing services in an emergency. Unfortunately, the school was closed in January 1933 for financial reasons. Implications for nursing education and nursing practice will be presented. Both primary and secondary sources were utilized for this historical research study. Primary sources included letters, government documents, school annual and an interview with an ASN graduate.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovation and excellence: The army school of nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Celiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCelia Bryant, PhD, Associate Professor, Western Kentucky University, Department of Nursing, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA, email: sue.bryant@wku.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166035-
dc.description.abstractOf international proportions created an immediate demand for trained nurses to care for civilians at home as well as soldiers at home and abroad. Numerous proposals were advanced for solving the problem of supplying nursing personnel including increased enrollments in nurse training schools, decreased length of training, Red Cross trained nurse's aids, the training of college graduates as nurses (Vassar Plan), and an Army School of Nursing (ASN). The purpose of this presentation is to describe those factors that influenced the development of the Army School of Nursing in 1918, its contributions to nursing education, the reasons for its survival long after the war was over, and the factors that brought about its abrupt demise. Proposed by a group of leaders in nursing education, women of exceptional education were to be prepared as nurses in army training camps during war. Innovative educational approaches were inaugurated and the school quickly earned a reputation as an outstanding educational institution. Although the school did not meet its original objectives of providing sufficient numbers of nurses for the war effort, it was deemed a success because it demonstrated the possibility of developing a well-established school and the likelihood of rapidly expanding nursing services in an emergency. Unfortunately, the school was closed in January 1933 for financial reasons. Implications for nursing education and nursing practice will be presented. Both primary and secondary sources were utilized for this historical research study. Primary sources included letters, government documents, school annual and an interview with an ASN graduate.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:53Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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