Anticipating And Limiting Attrition In Community-based Exercise Intervention Study Of Rural Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166039
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anticipating And Limiting Attrition In Community-based Exercise Intervention Study Of Rural Older Adults
Author(s):
Hogue, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Hogue, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chogue.uncson@mhs.unc.edu
Abstract:
In a single-masked study of integrated resistance training for sedentary, rural, community residing older adults with arthritis, 128 eligible subjects were screened, 106 were enrolled, and 97 subjects remained for an attrition rate of 8.5%. The study, "Reducing Frailty in Older Adults with Arthritis", was conducted in a county in Eastern North Carolina. The majority of residents (66%) lived in completely rural areas, with the remainder in small towns. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a 16-week training program designed to increase muscle strength, flexibility, aerobic capacity, and speed of task completion as well knowledge about, acceptability of, and support for exercise, would lead to improved health status and physical activity. Subjects (mean age 72 years) were predominantly (84.7%) female, slightly more than half (51%) were Caucasian, with no severe cognitive impairment, an average of 10 years of education, and nearly all had chronic conditions in addition to hip or knee arthritis. Although all subjects could walk, some were very frail. Participating in research was a new experience for nearly all. Most had never exercised before. Most subjects lived 5-20 miles from the intervention site, and very few had reliable transportation. All interventions were conducted in a large room in a church. The experimental intervention required subjects' attendance three mornings a week for 4 hours each time when transportation time is included; half of that time was devoted to the training. The training was demanding though individualized and progressive. The control intervention required subjects' attendance once a week. Control subjects were very disappointed to have been randomized to the control group. The measurements at 3 times over an 11 month period were challenging because of the nature of the tests, and sometimes because of the frailty of the subject. Our strategies for dealing with attrition were to enroll 10% more subjects than power analysis demanded, to value the culture we worked in, to respect individuals and attend to their concerns, to build trust, provide transportation, to draw upon the existing social network, and to make the training as interesting and relevant as possible for all subjects. Reasons for attrition in our sample, characteristics of dropouts compared to completers, and details of the strategies that allowed us to limit attrition to 8.5% will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnticipating And Limiting Attrition In Community-based Exercise Intervention Study Of Rural Older Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHogue, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Hogue, PhD, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chogue.uncson@mhs.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166039-
dc.description.abstractIn a single-masked study of integrated resistance training for sedentary, rural, community residing older adults with arthritis, 128 eligible subjects were screened, 106 were enrolled, and 97 subjects remained for an attrition rate of 8.5%. The study, "Reducing Frailty in Older Adults with Arthritis", was conducted in a county in Eastern North Carolina. The majority of residents (66%) lived in completely rural areas, with the remainder in small towns. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a 16-week training program designed to increase muscle strength, flexibility, aerobic capacity, and speed of task completion as well knowledge about, acceptability of, and support for exercise, would lead to improved health status and physical activity. Subjects (mean age 72 years) were predominantly (84.7%) female, slightly more than half (51%) were Caucasian, with no severe cognitive impairment, an average of 10 years of education, and nearly all had chronic conditions in addition to hip or knee arthritis. Although all subjects could walk, some were very frail. Participating in research was a new experience for nearly all. Most had never exercised before. Most subjects lived 5-20 miles from the intervention site, and very few had reliable transportation. All interventions were conducted in a large room in a church. The experimental intervention required subjects' attendance three mornings a week for 4 hours each time when transportation time is included; half of that time was devoted to the training. The training was demanding though individualized and progressive. The control intervention required subjects' attendance once a week. Control subjects were very disappointed to have been randomized to the control group. The measurements at 3 times over an 11 month period were challenging because of the nature of the tests, and sometimes because of the frailty of the subject. Our strategies for dealing with attrition were to enroll 10% more subjects than power analysis demanded, to value the culture we worked in, to respect individuals and attend to their concerns, to build trust, provide transportation, to draw upon the existing social network, and to make the training as interesting and relevant as possible for all subjects. Reasons for attrition in our sample, characteristics of dropouts compared to completers, and details of the strategies that allowed us to limit attrition to 8.5% will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:57Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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