Preparatory Information For Cardiac Catheterization Information Before Cardiac Catheterization That Helps Reduce Patients Distress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166043
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparatory Information For Cardiac Catheterization Information Before Cardiac Catheterization That Helps Reduce Patients Distress
Author(s):
Cason, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Cason, PhD, Professor, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: clcason@uta.edu
Abstract:
Implications: For patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization, anxiety reducing care is especially important since patients' anxiety can heighten their vulnerability to complications. Giving information that includes the steps of the procedure and the sensations to be experienced with each Step, a nursing intervention called concrete objective information (COD, is recommended before procedures like cardiac catheterization because it reduces patients' distress during the procedure. Recent research suggests that patients differ in bow much they want to know and that their level of anxiety depends on the match between how much they want to know and how much they are given. More research is needed about the effects of patients' preference for information so that nurses can give appropriate, anxiety reducing information to all. Purpose:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of differences in patients' desire for information on their anxiety when they got what they wanted and when they got more or less than they wanted. Research Questions: The specific question of this study was "'When patients get information that matches their preference for information will they have less anxiety during cardiac catheterization than when they get information that does not match their preference for information". Participants: 96 men and women scheduled for their first cardiac catheterzation and who had an uncomplicated procedure Methods: A questionnaire classified patients' preference for information. Patients then heard either video or audio taped COI or distracting information. Patients filled out questionnaires about their anxiety and discomfort before getting information, her getting information, and after catheterization. Heart rate was measured as patients got information and during catheterization. Results: Anxiety, discomfort, and heart rate were not different when patients' preference for information matched or not the information they heard. Two problems with the study contributed to these results: the questionnaire that measured patients' preference for information did not work well and all patients came to the study knowing about the procedure and what to expect. To adequately answer the question of this study, the study needs to be repeated using a revised (and stronger) questionnaire to identify patients' preference for information and information should be given to patients at the time they learn they are going to have the procedure (rather than right before the procedure is done).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparatory Information For Cardiac Catheterization Information Before Cardiac Catheterization That Helps Reduce Patients Distressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCason, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Cason, PhD, Professor, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: clcason@uta.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166043-
dc.description.abstractImplications: For patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization, anxiety reducing care is especially important since patients' anxiety can heighten their vulnerability to complications. Giving information that includes the steps of the procedure and the sensations to be experienced with each Step, a nursing intervention called concrete objective information (COD, is recommended before procedures like cardiac catheterization because it reduces patients' distress during the procedure. Recent research suggests that patients differ in bow much they want to know and that their level of anxiety depends on the match between how much they want to know and how much they are given. More research is needed about the effects of patients' preference for information so that nurses can give appropriate, anxiety reducing information to all. Purpose:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of differences in patients' desire for information on their anxiety when they got what they wanted and when they got more or less than they wanted. Research Questions: The specific question of this study was "'When patients get information that matches their preference for information will they have less anxiety during cardiac catheterization than when they get information that does not match their preference for information". Participants: 96 men and women scheduled for their first cardiac catheterzation and who had an uncomplicated procedure Methods: A questionnaire classified patients' preference for information. Patients then heard either video or audio taped COI or distracting information. Patients filled out questionnaires about their anxiety and discomfort before getting information, her getting information, and after catheterization. Heart rate was measured as patients got information and during catheterization. Results: Anxiety, discomfort, and heart rate were not different when patients' preference for information matched or not the information they heard. Two problems with the study contributed to these results: the questionnaire that measured patients' preference for information did not work well and all patients came to the study knowing about the procedure and what to expect. To adequately answer the question of this study, the study needs to be repeated using a revised (and stronger) questionnaire to identify patients' preference for information and information should be given to patients at the time they learn they are going to have the procedure (rather than right before the procedure is done).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:03Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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