2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166046
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mastery Of Stress And Health In Women Living With HIV Infection
Author(s):
Gray, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Gray, PhD, Faculty, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: jgray@uta.edu
Abstract:
It was not known to what extent HIV+ women used personal and environmental resources and experienced mastery and health in the midst of illness. The conceptual map for the study was developed from Folkman and Lazarus's cognitive transactional theory of stress (1984) and Younger's theory of mastery (1991). This cross-sectional study described the predictive effects of resource and stress factors on mastery of stress and on health. The study also explored the differences in mastery of stress and health between HIV+ women who were caring for someone else who was HIV + with those who were not. Methodology: HIV+ women (N=80) in 16 cities in 10 states completed a packet of research instruments about living with HIV infection. Data collectors were recruited from HIV clinical and service settings. Each packet of instruments included a demographic questionnaire, the Spiritual Perspective Scale (Reed, 1986), the Interpersonal Relationships Inventory (Tilden, Nelson, & May, 1990), the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (Stewart et al., 1988), and the clinical version of the Mastery of Stress Scale (Younger, 1993). In the study, Cronbach' s alpha was above .80 for all instruments. Findings: The sample (mean age=35.8) included 41 minority women. The women had been living with HIV infection for an average of 45.8 months. Heterosexual contact was the primary mode of transmission. Multiple regression analysis revealed the resource factors of spiritual perspective, size of the support network, and social support exerted a greater influence on mastery of stress than did the stress factors. However, the personal resources of income, education, support network, social support, and spiritual perspective did not explain more of the variance in health than the stress factors studied of interpersonal conflict, stage of the infection, caregiving responsibilities, and perceived stress intensity. There were no significant differences in mastery of stress and in health between the women who were HIV caregivers (n=20) and those who were not (n=60). Implications: Women with HIV infection can live for several years with the infection. Clinical assessment of HIV seropositive women should include questions about social support, spiritual perspective, interpersonal conflict, and perceptions of stress. Nurses can facilitate the use of personal and environmental resources to potentiate mastery of stress. In addition, nurses can support the efforts of HIV seropositive women in their efforts to decrease interpersonal conflict and stressors that interfere with health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMastery Of Stress And Health In Women Living With HIV Infectionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGray, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Gray, PhD, Faculty, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: jgray@uta.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166046-
dc.description.abstractIt was not known to what extent HIV+ women used personal and environmental resources and experienced mastery and health in the midst of illness. The conceptual map for the study was developed from Folkman and Lazarus's cognitive transactional theory of stress (1984) and Younger's theory of mastery (1991). This cross-sectional study described the predictive effects of resource and stress factors on mastery of stress and on health. The study also explored the differences in mastery of stress and health between HIV+ women who were caring for someone else who was HIV + with those who were not. Methodology: HIV+ women (N=80) in 16 cities in 10 states completed a packet of research instruments about living with HIV infection. Data collectors were recruited from HIV clinical and service settings. Each packet of instruments included a demographic questionnaire, the Spiritual Perspective Scale (Reed, 1986), the Interpersonal Relationships Inventory (Tilden, Nelson, & May, 1990), the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (Stewart et al., 1988), and the clinical version of the Mastery of Stress Scale (Younger, 1993). In the study, Cronbach' s alpha was above .80 for all instruments. Findings: The sample (mean age=35.8) included 41 minority women. The women had been living with HIV infection for an average of 45.8 months. Heterosexual contact was the primary mode of transmission. Multiple regression analysis revealed the resource factors of spiritual perspective, size of the support network, and social support exerted a greater influence on mastery of stress than did the stress factors. However, the personal resources of income, education, support network, social support, and spiritual perspective did not explain more of the variance in health than the stress factors studied of interpersonal conflict, stage of the infection, caregiving responsibilities, and perceived stress intensity. There were no significant differences in mastery of stress and in health between the women who were HIV caregivers (n=20) and those who were not (n=60). Implications: Women with HIV infection can live for several years with the infection. Clinical assessment of HIV seropositive women should include questions about social support, spiritual perspective, interpersonal conflict, and perceptions of stress. Nurses can facilitate the use of personal and environmental resources to potentiate mastery of stress. In addition, nurses can support the efforts of HIV seropositive women in their efforts to decrease interpersonal conflict and stressors that interfere with health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:07Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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