The Effects Of Short-term Interventions On Self-esteem And Other Cognitive Perceptual Variables In Young Adult Women With HPV Or HSV Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166047
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects Of Short-term Interventions On Self-esteem And Other Cognitive Perceptual Variables In Young Adult Women With HPV Or HSV Infections
Author(s):
Youngkin, Ellis
Author Details:
Ellis Youngkin, PhD, Florida Atlantic University College of Nursing, Boca Raton, Florida, USA, email: eyoungkin@fau.edu
Abstract:
Sexually transmitted diseases, especially herpes simplex (HSV) and human papillomaviral (HPV) infections, are a significant and growing problem in adolescents and young adults. Using a pre-test-post-test experimental design, the study tested the impact of a self-help module which included content about the disease, skills to live with the disease and means to prevent the spread of the infection on self-concept, satisfaction with intimate relationships, self-esteem, body image, and knowledge about the disease in young adult women who had a diagnosis of HSV or HPV. Forty women with HSV and 58 women with HPV participated in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group. These young women were primarily white, single, heterosexual, and all were enrolled in college. They primarily sought health services because of symptoms of infection and 60% reported that their symptoms were interfering with their intimate relationships. A statistically significant relationship existed between having the disease and interference with lifestyle, with the HSV group reporting the greater lifestyle compromise because of symptoms. Additionally, the HSV experimental group gained a statistically significant improvement in self-esteem score. Differences on other perceptual variables were not significant, though greater improvements in mean group scores for some variables did occur with the experimental groups. Most women were currently in a monogamous sexual relationship, but only 7% reported having only one lifetime partner. Seventy-five percent were currently using condoms or condoms and a spermicide. The women knew a great deal about their disease, had positive self-concept, body image and self-esteem. Despite having a good understanding of their disease and how it is spread, twenty-five percent of the women engaged in high-risk sexual activity which contributes to the further spread of infection. The study findings reinforce the need to develop more effective strategies to reduce high-risk sexual behavior in young adults, as well as indicating that a self-help module may be beneficial to women's self-esteem, especially when the diagnosis is herpes simplex genitalis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects Of Short-term Interventions On Self-esteem And Other Cognitive Perceptual Variables In Young Adult Women With HPV Or HSV Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoungkin, Ellisen_US
dc.author.detailsEllis Youngkin, PhD, Florida Atlantic University College of Nursing, Boca Raton, Florida, USA, email: eyoungkin@fau.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166047-
dc.description.abstractSexually transmitted diseases, especially herpes simplex (HSV) and human papillomaviral (HPV) infections, are a significant and growing problem in adolescents and young adults. Using a pre-test-post-test experimental design, the study tested the impact of a self-help module which included content about the disease, skills to live with the disease and means to prevent the spread of the infection on self-concept, satisfaction with intimate relationships, self-esteem, body image, and knowledge about the disease in young adult women who had a diagnosis of HSV or HPV. Forty women with HSV and 58 women with HPV participated in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group. These young women were primarily white, single, heterosexual, and all were enrolled in college. They primarily sought health services because of symptoms of infection and 60% reported that their symptoms were interfering with their intimate relationships. A statistically significant relationship existed between having the disease and interference with lifestyle, with the HSV group reporting the greater lifestyle compromise because of symptoms. Additionally, the HSV experimental group gained a statistically significant improvement in self-esteem score. Differences on other perceptual variables were not significant, though greater improvements in mean group scores for some variables did occur with the experimental groups. Most women were currently in a monogamous sexual relationship, but only 7% reported having only one lifetime partner. Seventy-five percent were currently using condoms or condoms and a spermicide. The women knew a great deal about their disease, had positive self-concept, body image and self-esteem. Despite having a good understanding of their disease and how it is spread, twenty-five percent of the women engaged in high-risk sexual activity which contributes to the further spread of infection. The study findings reinforce the need to develop more effective strategies to reduce high-risk sexual behavior in young adults, as well as indicating that a self-help module may be beneficial to women's self-esteem, especially when the diagnosis is herpes simplex genitalis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:08Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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