Adolescents With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing? Or Teens With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166049
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing? Or Teens With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing?
Author(s):
Sawin, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Sawin, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Interim Chairperson, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing and School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated 2015) email: sawin@uwm.edu
Abstract:
Implications: This study of teens in generally good epilepsy control suggests that epilepsy severity may not influence these teens perception of themselves. These teens see themselves as teens first, and the impact of having epilepsy might be in the normal teen activities it changes more than the severity of the condition itself. Parents and professionals need to focus on how to decrease these changes in normal teen activities. Purpose: This study was done because previous research has shown teens with epilepsy can be at risk for increased psychological and social problems. We wanted to know how teens with this condition see themselves. Research Questions: How does the teen feel he or she is doing with the issues that teens face? How is their self-esteem? What are their perceptions of how well they are doing in eight important areas for teens such as: social, academic, romantic and behavior? Does it matter how many seizures the teen has, what decisions the teens make, whether they are optimistic about the future, how much time they spend with their friends and how protective they think their parents are? Participants: Participants in the study were 50 teens l2-21 years old, diagnosed with epilepsy and functioning at approximately grade level in school. Interviews were conducted in the teen's home and included a well respected measure of psychological health. Results: Teens had an average of 3 seizures in the last year, fairly good perceived seizure control, and minimal problems with post seizure symptoms. They also had moderately positive overall and specific perceptions of themselves. No epilepsy-related variable (number of seizures in the last year, perceived epilepsy control, or perceived stress of epilepsy) was related to their psychosocial health. Teen's decision making, friendship patterns, hope, and future orientation were related to teen's views of themselves in specific areas. Teens were more stressed by their everyday life than their epilepsy. However, their epilepsy stress was related to their perception of parental over-protectiveness and the teen's future expectations were related to their perception of epilepsy control.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing? Or Teens With Epilepsy: How Are They Doing?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSawin, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Sawin, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Interim Chairperson, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing and School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA, (updated 2015) email: sawin@uwm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166049-
dc.description.abstractImplications: This study of teens in generally good epilepsy control suggests that epilepsy severity may not influence these teens perception of themselves. These teens see themselves as teens first, and the impact of having epilepsy might be in the normal teen activities it changes more than the severity of the condition itself. Parents and professionals need to focus on how to decrease these changes in normal teen activities. Purpose: This study was done because previous research has shown teens with epilepsy can be at risk for increased psychological and social problems. We wanted to know how teens with this condition see themselves. Research Questions: How does the teen feel he or she is doing with the issues that teens face? How is their self-esteem? What are their perceptions of how well they are doing in eight important areas for teens such as: social, academic, romantic and behavior? Does it matter how many seizures the teen has, what decisions the teens make, whether they are optimistic about the future, how much time they spend with their friends and how protective they think their parents are? Participants: Participants in the study were 50 teens l2-21 years old, diagnosed with epilepsy and functioning at approximately grade level in school. Interviews were conducted in the teen's home and included a well respected measure of psychological health. Results: Teens had an average of 3 seizures in the last year, fairly good perceived seizure control, and minimal problems with post seizure symptoms. They also had moderately positive overall and specific perceptions of themselves. No epilepsy-related variable (number of seizures in the last year, perceived epilepsy control, or perceived stress of epilepsy) was related to their psychosocial health. Teen's decision making, friendship patterns, hope, and future orientation were related to teen's views of themselves in specific areas. Teens were more stressed by their everyday life than their epilepsy. However, their epilepsy stress was related to their perception of parental over-protectiveness and the teen's future expectations were related to their perception of epilepsy control.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:10Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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