2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166051
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attention, Coping, And Activity Outcomes In Child Orthopaedic Surgery
Author(s):
LaMontagne, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine how children's preoperative focus of attention on the stresses of surgery related to their preoperative coping and return to usual activities during recovery. Focus of attention is concerned with whether a person focuses on the source of stress such as the objective aspects of the event, or on his or her emotional reactions to it. Children (N=97) between the ages of 8 and 17 years who were undergoing major orthopaedic surgery participated in the study. Data were collected the day before surgery, and at 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Based on content analysis of interviews, children's attention was classified according to three different foci: concrete objective (n=25), emotion (n=36), and vague focused (n=36). A 3 x 3 factorial design was used to analyze the data. The first factor was attention having three levels and the second factor was time, a repeated measures factor having three levels: 3 months, 6 months, and 9 months. The analysis of this design yielded a main effect for attention focus, assessing differences between attention focus groups; a main effect for time, assessing differences over time; and an attention focus by time interaction effect, assessing whether the differences between the groups were consistent over time. All tests used an alpha of .05. Children who focused on the concrete-objective aspects of surgery had the most positive activity outcomes, followed by the emotion-focused attention group. Children who were classified as having vague focused attentions had the least favorable activity outcomes. The relationship between attention focus and activities was further explored by adding coping as another independent variable to assess possible coping by attention focus interactive effects on activity outcomes. When there were significant coping by attention interaction effects, vigilant copers who had a concrete-objective focus of attention had the most favorable activity outcomes at each time of measurement. Children who were able to focus their attention on concrete aspects of the experience tended to use vigilant coping and were able to return to their usual activities sooner. These findings may guide development of interventions that direct children's attention to the concrete-objective aspects of the recovery regimen. However, more research is needed to determine whether focusing on the concrete-objective aspects of the situation enhances children's confidence in their ability to cope more actively with specific long-term demands of recovery such as immobility and activity restrictions. Assessing a child's return to usual activities following major orthopaedic surgery provides an individualized assessment of the effectiveness of coping strategies and is a good indicator of the child's management of stresses over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttention, Coping, And Activity Outcomes In Child Orthopaedic Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaMontagne, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda LaMontagne, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: lynda.lamontagne@mcmail.vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166051-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine how children's preoperative focus of attention on the stresses of surgery related to their preoperative coping and return to usual activities during recovery. Focus of attention is concerned with whether a person focuses on the source of stress such as the objective aspects of the event, or on his or her emotional reactions to it. Children (N=97) between the ages of 8 and 17 years who were undergoing major orthopaedic surgery participated in the study. Data were collected the day before surgery, and at 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Based on content analysis of interviews, children's attention was classified according to three different foci: concrete objective (n=25), emotion (n=36), and vague focused (n=36). A 3 x 3 factorial design was used to analyze the data. The first factor was attention having three levels and the second factor was time, a repeated measures factor having three levels: 3 months, 6 months, and 9 months. The analysis of this design yielded a main effect for attention focus, assessing differences between attention focus groups; a main effect for time, assessing differences over time; and an attention focus by time interaction effect, assessing whether the differences between the groups were consistent over time. All tests used an alpha of .05. Children who focused on the concrete-objective aspects of surgery had the most positive activity outcomes, followed by the emotion-focused attention group. Children who were classified as having vague focused attentions had the least favorable activity outcomes. The relationship between attention focus and activities was further explored by adding coping as another independent variable to assess possible coping by attention focus interactive effects on activity outcomes. When there were significant coping by attention interaction effects, vigilant copers who had a concrete-objective focus of attention had the most favorable activity outcomes at each time of measurement. Children who were able to focus their attention on concrete aspects of the experience tended to use vigilant coping and were able to return to their usual activities sooner. These findings may guide development of interventions that direct children's attention to the concrete-objective aspects of the recovery regimen. However, more research is needed to determine whether focusing on the concrete-objective aspects of the situation enhances children's confidence in their ability to cope more actively with specific long-term demands of recovery such as immobility and activity restrictions. Assessing a child's return to usual activities following major orthopaedic surgery provides an individualized assessment of the effectiveness of coping strategies and is a good indicator of the child's management of stresses over time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:13Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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