Mother-child Interaction In The Presence Of Maternal HIV Infection: A Study Of The Interaction Between Mothers And Their Children When The Mother Has HIV Infection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166053
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mother-child Interaction In The Presence Of Maternal HIV Infection: A Study Of The Interaction Between Mothers And Their Children When The Mother Has HIV Infection
Author(s):
Johnson, Merrilyn
Author Details:
Merrilyn Johnson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: moj@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
A child's early interaction with the mother, or primary caregiver, is vitally important to their development. The interaction between a mother and her child can be changed by influences from the mother, the child, and their shared circumstances. Mothers who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have to deal with added problems along with the usual anxieties of parenthood. These concerns have the ability to interfere with the way mothers may relate to their children and how the children may respond to their mothers. To investigate whether HIV infected (positive) mothers and their children interacted differently from HIV negative mothers and children, this study described and compared mother-child interaction in 25 HIV positive mothers and the child born while they were HIV infected, and 25 HIV negative mothers and their children. The study involved a mainly African American population from a southeastern state. The mothers were videotaped as they taught their child a skill and the tape was then examined and scored by a qualified nurse researcher. Some other measures relating to child development, depression of the mother, and the home surroundings of the child were also recorded. In the total study group of 50 mothers and children, it was found that the mothers were less interactive and less responsive to their children than mothers in the general population. No significant difference was shown in mother-child interaction between the HIV positive mothers and their children and the HIV negative mother/child group. The study results also indicated that mothers with HIV infection reported more depressive symptoms than the uninfected mothers. Further research will be needed to find specific causes for these findings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMother-child Interaction In The Presence Of Maternal HIV Infection: A Study Of The Interaction Between Mothers And Their Children When The Mother Has HIV Infectionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Merrilynen_US
dc.author.detailsMerrilyn Johnson, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: moj@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166053-
dc.description.abstractA child's early interaction with the mother, or primary caregiver, is vitally important to their development. The interaction between a mother and her child can be changed by influences from the mother, the child, and their shared circumstances. Mothers who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have to deal with added problems along with the usual anxieties of parenthood. These concerns have the ability to interfere with the way mothers may relate to their children and how the children may respond to their mothers. To investigate whether HIV infected (positive) mothers and their children interacted differently from HIV negative mothers and children, this study described and compared mother-child interaction in 25 HIV positive mothers and the child born while they were HIV infected, and 25 HIV negative mothers and their children. The study involved a mainly African American population from a southeastern state. The mothers were videotaped as they taught their child a skill and the tape was then examined and scored by a qualified nurse researcher. Some other measures relating to child development, depression of the mother, and the home surroundings of the child were also recorded. In the total study group of 50 mothers and children, it was found that the mothers were less interactive and less responsive to their children than mothers in the general population. No significant difference was shown in mother-child interaction between the HIV positive mothers and their children and the HIV negative mother/child group. The study results also indicated that mothers with HIV infection reported more depressive symptoms than the uninfected mothers. Further research will be needed to find specific causes for these findings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:15Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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