2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166055
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Long-term Non-progression With HIV Disease
Author(s):
Barroso, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.edu
Abstract:
A naturalistic study design using ethnographic interviews was employed to elicit data from 20 men and 5 women who were long-term non-progressors with HIV disease. Theoretical sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included a CD4 count of 500 or greater, HIV positive for 7 or more years, English speaking, and at least 18 years old. Data were generated through intensive open-ended interviews and demographic information sheets. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques and the method of constant comparison. Findings were validated with several of the study participants. The final analysis included 3 African American males, 17 Caucasian males, 2 African American females, 1 Caucasian female, and 2 African American transsexuals who identified themselves as female. The mean CD4 count was 757; the mean number of years of seropositivity was 9.8 years. Fourteen of the participants were on some form of antiretroviral medication. Many participants reported a period of intense drug and alcohol abuse after they were diagnosed, believing that they were going to die soon. Once they outlived the predictions of their health care providers, they reported an epiphany wherein they resolved to turn their lives around. Motivating factors for becoming a long-term non-progressor were having a will to live, desiring to stay healthy for loved ones, having hope, not perceiving HIV as a death sentence, refusing to let their illness define them, and viewing HIV as fate or destiny. Assumptions that they made as they embarked on their journey to live with HIV included recognizing the mind/body link; developing a sense of self-worth; trusting their bodies; believing that they could stay strong through whatever lay before them; knowing that they were doing their best; and being able to change their perspective and make adjustments as they remained healthy. The themes emerging in data analysis that participants identified as helping them remain healthy and avoid progression to AIDS include human connectedness (altruism, supportive relationships, and reciprocity); taking care of the physical self; taking care of the emotional/mental self (active cognitive strategies and active behavioral strategies); spirituality (surrender to a higher power, belief in a supportive higher power); and viewing HIV as a chronic, manageable illness. Implications for health care providers and those living with HIV will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLong-term Non-progression With HIV Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166055-
dc.description.abstractA naturalistic study design using ethnographic interviews was employed to elicit data from 20 men and 5 women who were long-term non-progressors with HIV disease. Theoretical sampling techniques were used to elicit participants in the Tampa Bay area. Criteria for selection included a CD4 count of 500 or greater, HIV positive for 7 or more years, English speaking, and at least 18 years old. Data were generated through intensive open-ended interviews and demographic information sheets. Data were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis techniques and the method of constant comparison. Findings were validated with several of the study participants. The final analysis included 3 African American males, 17 Caucasian males, 2 African American females, 1 Caucasian female, and 2 African American transsexuals who identified themselves as female. The mean CD4 count was 757; the mean number of years of seropositivity was 9.8 years. Fourteen of the participants were on some form of antiretroviral medication. Many participants reported a period of intense drug and alcohol abuse after they were diagnosed, believing that they were going to die soon. Once they outlived the predictions of their health care providers, they reported an epiphany wherein they resolved to turn their lives around. Motivating factors for becoming a long-term non-progressor were having a will to live, desiring to stay healthy for loved ones, having hope, not perceiving HIV as a death sentence, refusing to let their illness define them, and viewing HIV as fate or destiny. Assumptions that they made as they embarked on their journey to live with HIV included recognizing the mind/body link; developing a sense of self-worth; trusting their bodies; believing that they could stay strong through whatever lay before them; knowing that they were doing their best; and being able to change their perspective and make adjustments as they remained healthy. The themes emerging in data analysis that participants identified as helping them remain healthy and avoid progression to AIDS include human connectedness (altruism, supportive relationships, and reciprocity); taking care of the physical self; taking care of the emotional/mental self (active cognitive strategies and active behavioral strategies); spirituality (surrender to a higher power, belief in a supportive higher power); and viewing HIV as a chronic, manageable illness. Implications for health care providers and those living with HIV will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:18Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.