2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166056
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Realigning Roles: Older Caregivers Of Persons With AIDS
Author(s):
Robinson, Beverly
Author Details:
Beverly Robinson, PhD, Professor/Associate Dean of Graduate Nursing Program, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: robinsonb@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
The evolving chronicity of persons living with HIV/AIDS infection has increasingly shifted toward more home care, especially the management of late stage AIDS. Whereas the dilemmas and caregiving burden of spouses and partners are well documented in the literature, little is known about the caregiver experience of older family members. Naturalistic findings from a study of home febrile symptom management in persons with AIDS (PWA) indicate that aging relatives, primarily mothers are increasingly assuming caregiving responsibilities. Specific Aims: This study was designed to provide information about how aging caregivers of PWA cope with a variety of educational, communication, and planning issues. Educational considerations focus on providing information to the older caregiver on facts about AIDS, infection control, understanding caregiving and the physical demands of providing care. Communication issues relate to role reversal between the older care provider and their child with AIDS, financial alterations, intergenerational conflicts, and lifestyle differences. Planning concerns focus on balancing the life needs of the older caregiver with the physical and emotional demands of caring for PWA. Further, role stress for parents is frequently complicated by issues of stigma and financial strain. Methods: The unit of sampling was a parent or parents (n = 11) living in a caregiving situation with their adult child with AIDS. Methods of participant observation were used. Open-ended interviews encouraged PWA and their aging parents, primarily mothers, to disclose how their life/lifestyle had been altered by resuming caregiving roles as a result of AIDS. Findings: While no inferences can be drawn from qualitative data, the importance of the role reversal of older parent as caregiver of an ill adult child, the disruption of retirement activities, and the intensity of caregiving responsibilities were dominant themes. Physical demands of caregiving are complicated by health infirmities of parents. Implications: Nurses can make a critical difference in facilitating the plight of the older caregiver and PWA. Nurses can assist in closing the information gap by providing current and complete facts about disease transmission, disease progression, infection control precautions, respite, and anticipatory guidance.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRealigning Roles: Older Caregivers Of Persons With AIDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Beverlyen_US
dc.author.detailsBeverly Robinson, PhD, Professor/Associate Dean of Graduate Nursing Program, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: robinsonb@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166056-
dc.description.abstractThe evolving chronicity of persons living with HIV/AIDS infection has increasingly shifted toward more home care, especially the management of late stage AIDS. Whereas the dilemmas and caregiving burden of spouses and partners are well documented in the literature, little is known about the caregiver experience of older family members. Naturalistic findings from a study of home febrile symptom management in persons with AIDS (PWA) indicate that aging relatives, primarily mothers are increasingly assuming caregiving responsibilities. Specific Aims: This study was designed to provide information about how aging caregivers of PWA cope with a variety of educational, communication, and planning issues. Educational considerations focus on providing information to the older caregiver on facts about AIDS, infection control, understanding caregiving and the physical demands of providing care. Communication issues relate to role reversal between the older care provider and their child with AIDS, financial alterations, intergenerational conflicts, and lifestyle differences. Planning concerns focus on balancing the life needs of the older caregiver with the physical and emotional demands of caring for PWA. Further, role stress for parents is frequently complicated by issues of stigma and financial strain. Methods: The unit of sampling was a parent or parents (n = 11) living in a caregiving situation with their adult child with AIDS. Methods of participant observation were used. Open-ended interviews encouraged PWA and their aging parents, primarily mothers, to disclose how their life/lifestyle had been altered by resuming caregiving roles as a result of AIDS. Findings: While no inferences can be drawn from qualitative data, the importance of the role reversal of older parent as caregiver of an ill adult child, the disruption of retirement activities, and the intensity of caregiving responsibilities were dominant themes. Physical demands of caregiving are complicated by health infirmities of parents. Implications: Nurses can make a critical difference in facilitating the plight of the older caregiver and PWA. Nurses can assist in closing the information gap by providing current and complete facts about disease transmission, disease progression, infection control precautions, respite, and anticipatory guidance.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:19Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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