2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166058
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect Of Activity On Sleep In Cognitively-impaired Veterans: A Pilot Study
Author(s):
Richards, Kathy
Author Details:
Kathy Richards, PhD, VAMC, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: kricha11@gmu.edu
Abstract:
Sleep-activity rhythm disturbance is a highly prevalent, disabling symptom in cognitively-impaired (CI) persons. Medical treatment with benzodiazepines or antipsychotic medications has proven only minimally effective and has serious side effects. Daytime napping and nocturnal wakefulness in elders may reflect limited purposive activities that previously sustained daytime alertness. Thus, the purpose of this pilot study was to test the effect of an Individualized Activity Intervention (IAI) on nocturnal sleep and affect of CI nursing home residents with sleep-activity rhythm disturbance. The sample consisted of five CI elderly male veterans in a nursing home who slept less than 85% of the night and at least 30 minutes during the daytime. Following one week of baseline actigraph data and a comprehensive assessment of each resident's current cognitive, physical, communication, sensory, and emotional status, past interests, and daytime sleeping patterns, subjects received the IAI for 14 days. The intervention consisted of individualized activities such as objects for tactile and visual stimulation, arts and crafts, and games that were conducted during periods of daytime sleepiness. Project nursing assistants conducted the IAI, which required minimal supervision and occurred in individual or group settings, for a minimum of one hour daily, 7 days a week. Sleep-activity patterns were measured using the actigraph on days 1,3, and 5 of baseline and on days 10,12, and 14 of the intervention, and means for the three days were calculated. Results follow. Percent Nocturnal Minutes Sleep from time Asleep from Minutes Daytime Sleep Bedtime to Risetime Bedtime to Risetime BaselineIAIBaselineIAIBaselineIAI Subject A192.0224.027.732.365.033.7 Subject B549.7565.781.087.2219.0117.0 Subject C410.7436.358.066.094.338.7 Subject D185.0232.027.037.0108.0148.0 Subject E298.7310.743.748.743.061.3 Mean327.2353.747.554.2105.979.7 (sd)(154.7)(146.0)(22.7)(22.5)(68.1)(50.5) Although the sample consisted of only five subjects, we successfully engaged CI residents in activities, decreased daytime napping, and improved affect. Subjects in the experimental group slept 27 minutes longer and percent nocturnal time asleep improved by 6.8% (95% Confidence Interval = 2.58 - 9.90, p <.01). This pilot study demonstrated that individualized activities tailored to residents' interests and capitalizing on their remaining abilities improved nocturnal sleep and affect, and reduced daytime napping.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect Of Activity On Sleep In Cognitively-impaired Veterans: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Richards, PhD, VAMC, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: kricha11@gmu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166058-
dc.description.abstractSleep-activity rhythm disturbance is a highly prevalent, disabling symptom in cognitively-impaired (CI) persons. Medical treatment with benzodiazepines or antipsychotic medications has proven only minimally effective and has serious side effects. Daytime napping and nocturnal wakefulness in elders may reflect limited purposive activities that previously sustained daytime alertness. Thus, the purpose of this pilot study was to test the effect of an Individualized Activity Intervention (IAI) on nocturnal sleep and affect of CI nursing home residents with sleep-activity rhythm disturbance. The sample consisted of five CI elderly male veterans in a nursing home who slept less than 85% of the night and at least 30 minutes during the daytime. Following one week of baseline actigraph data and a comprehensive assessment of each resident's current cognitive, physical, communication, sensory, and emotional status, past interests, and daytime sleeping patterns, subjects received the IAI for 14 days. The intervention consisted of individualized activities such as objects for tactile and visual stimulation, arts and crafts, and games that were conducted during periods of daytime sleepiness. Project nursing assistants conducted the IAI, which required minimal supervision and occurred in individual or group settings, for a minimum of one hour daily, 7 days a week. Sleep-activity patterns were measured using the actigraph on days 1,3, and 5 of baseline and on days 10,12, and 14 of the intervention, and means for the three days were calculated. Results follow. Percent Nocturnal Minutes Sleep from time Asleep from Minutes Daytime Sleep Bedtime to Risetime Bedtime to Risetime BaselineIAIBaselineIAIBaselineIAI Subject A192.0224.027.732.365.033.7 Subject B549.7565.781.087.2219.0117.0 Subject C410.7436.358.066.094.338.7 Subject D185.0232.027.037.0108.0148.0 Subject E298.7310.743.748.743.061.3 Mean327.2353.747.554.2105.979.7 (sd)(154.7)(146.0)(22.7)(22.5)(68.1)(50.5) Although the sample consisted of only five subjects, we successfully engaged CI residents in activities, decreased daytime napping, and improved affect. Subjects in the experimental group slept 27 minutes longer and percent nocturnal time asleep improved by 6.8% (95% Confidence Interval = 2.58 - 9.90, p <.01). This pilot study demonstrated that individualized activities tailored to residents' interests and capitalizing on their remaining abilities improved nocturnal sleep and affect, and reduced daytime napping.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:21Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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