2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166060
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-efficacy Theory: Recalling Its Roots
Author(s):
Hale, Patty
Author Details:
Patty Hale, PhD, Lynchburg College Department of Nursing, Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: halepj@jmu.edu
Abstract:
Bandura (1977) proposed self-efficacy theory as a theory to explain and predict health behavior. The theory consists of two dimensions: efficacy and outcome expectancy. Efficacy expectation, often used synonymously with self-efficacy, is defined as the extent to which persons view themselves as capable of performing a specific behavior. Efficacy expectancy is analyzed through three domains: strength, which is the judgment of perceived ability to perform a behavior; level or magnitude, which is the perceived difficulty of the behavior; and generality, the extent to which perceived efficacy expectations are generalizable to other situations. Outcome expectation is defined as the judgment that behavior will result in a specific outcome. Originally, the theory was applied to phobia studies that were laboratory-based. Since that time, field research has occurred across multiple disciplines applying it to several health-related behaviors, including smoking cessation and sexually transmitted disease prevention. Issues related to applying the theory are the accuracy of the conceptual definition, be it generalized self-efficacy versus behavior-specific self-efficacy, differences in outcome expectancy versus efficacy expectancy; and overlap with other concepts such as self-esteem and health locus of control. Changes in measuring efficacy expectancy since Bandura's first work have occurred. Congruence between the theoretical definition and indicators determines whether the findings are valid and relevant. Examples of applications of the theory are highlighted in this evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-efficacy Theory: Recalling Its Rootsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHale, Pattyen_US
dc.author.detailsPatty Hale, PhD, Lynchburg College Department of Nursing, Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: halepj@jmu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166060-
dc.description.abstractBandura (1977) proposed self-efficacy theory as a theory to explain and predict health behavior. The theory consists of two dimensions: efficacy and outcome expectancy. Efficacy expectation, often used synonymously with self-efficacy, is defined as the extent to which persons view themselves as capable of performing a specific behavior. Efficacy expectancy is analyzed through three domains: strength, which is the judgment of perceived ability to perform a behavior; level or magnitude, which is the perceived difficulty of the behavior; and generality, the extent to which perceived efficacy expectations are generalizable to other situations. Outcome expectation is defined as the judgment that behavior will result in a specific outcome. Originally, the theory was applied to phobia studies that were laboratory-based. Since that time, field research has occurred across multiple disciplines applying it to several health-related behaviors, including smoking cessation and sexually transmitted disease prevention. Issues related to applying the theory are the accuracy of the conceptual definition, be it generalized self-efficacy versus behavior-specific self-efficacy, differences in outcome expectancy versus efficacy expectancy; and overlap with other concepts such as self-esteem and health locus of control. Changes in measuring efficacy expectancy since Bandura's first work have occurred. Congruence between the theoretical definition and indicators determines whether the findings are valid and relevant. Examples of applications of the theory are highlighted in this evaluation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:24Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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