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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166061
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complex Or Comprehensive?: Cox's Interaction Model Of Client Health Behavior
Author(s):
Carter, Kimberly
Author Details:
Kimberly Carter, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Nursing Education Specialist, Radford University, Christiansburg, Virginia, USA email: kcarter@runet.edu
Abstract:
The Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was proposed in 1982 as a prescriptive nursing framework by Dr. Cheryl Cox RN. The first fifteen years of primarily nursing research suggests that the model may be useful for research and practice. The complexity of the model poses a challenge for its application with respect to funding and practical usage issues. However, a complex model may be necessary to represent the complex phenemonon of health behavior. Emphasis on outcomes is becoming increasingly important in today's health care and research environments. An important aspect of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior is its ability to reflect client outcomes resulting from client-professional interactions. The Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior will be reviewed in terms of its historical development, components, and major assumptions. Fawcett's evaluation framework for conceptual models of nursing (1980) will structure a critique of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, including research using the model. A strength of the model is implied by research in the ability to explain large percentages of variance. Limitations of current research using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior include types of statistical analyses used, homogeneity of samples included in testing, and limited portions of the model tested. The issue of nonrecursiveness and the model's lack of a feedback loop will be discussed. Recommendations for future directions with research using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior include hypothesis testing with more rigorous statistical procedures, more diversity in samples, and more comprehensive use of the model, including the elements of client-professional interaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplex Or Comprehensive?: Cox's Interaction Model Of Client Health Behavioren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Carter, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Nursing Education Specialist, Radford University, Christiansburg, Virginia, USA email: kcarter@runet.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166061-
dc.description.abstractThe Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was proposed in 1982 as a prescriptive nursing framework by Dr. Cheryl Cox RN. The first fifteen years of primarily nursing research suggests that the model may be useful for research and practice. The complexity of the model poses a challenge for its application with respect to funding and practical usage issues. However, a complex model may be necessary to represent the complex phenemonon of health behavior. Emphasis on outcomes is becoming increasingly important in today's health care and research environments. An important aspect of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior is its ability to reflect client outcomes resulting from client-professional interactions. The Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior will be reviewed in terms of its historical development, components, and major assumptions. Fawcett's evaluation framework for conceptual models of nursing (1980) will structure a critique of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, including research using the model. A strength of the model is implied by research in the ability to explain large percentages of variance. Limitations of current research using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior include types of statistical analyses used, homogeneity of samples included in testing, and limited portions of the model tested. The issue of nonrecursiveness and the model's lack of a feedback loop will be discussed. Recommendations for future directions with research using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior include hypothesis testing with more rigorous statistical procedures, more diversity in samples, and more comprehensive use of the model, including the elements of client-professional interaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:25Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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