2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166062
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rethinking The Use Of Knowledge For Health Promotion/disease Prevention
Author(s):
Kulbok, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Kulbok, DNS/DNSc/DSN, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pk6c@Virginia.EDU
Abstract:
The major purposes of this symposium are: 1) to revive critical discussions of models and theories from the behavioral, biological and nursing sciences for health promotion/disease prevention, and 2) to rethink future directions regarding the utility and application of selected models. Marston-Scott's (1988) seminal contribution to the nursing literature on "the use of knowledge" for health promotion provides a useful historical and theoretical foundation for evaluation of current and future directions for intervention research to promote health behavior change. The influence of underlying assumptions regarding health and illness, theoretical and empirical definitions of health and illness behavior, national and international prevention initiatives instituted since the 1 970s, and the political agenda "driving" health policy and research funding decisions are also considered. Building on these foundational perspectives, selected models and constructs which were developed and tested prior to and during the early 1980s (Health Belief Model, Social Cognitive Learning Theory, Theory of Reasoned Action) and subsequent conceptual adaptations and new models (Health Promotion Model, Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, Resource Model, Transtheoretical Model) will be highlighted. Although numerous conceptual and methodological issues require continued attention, there has been considerable progress toward the identification of key elements and/or common constructs across the range of models which are predictive of health behavior (benefits, self-efficacy, intention, social norms, environment, motivation). Continued scholarly inquiry and critical evaluation of theoretical foundations and multidisciplinary perspectives are required to better prepare nurse scientists to face the challenges of health promotion research in the 21st century.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRethinking The Use Of Knowledge For Health Promotion/disease Preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKulbok, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Kulbok, DNS/DNSc/DSN, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pk6c@Virginia.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166062-
dc.description.abstractThe major purposes of this symposium are: 1) to revive critical discussions of models and theories from the behavioral, biological and nursing sciences for health promotion/disease prevention, and 2) to rethink future directions regarding the utility and application of selected models. Marston-Scott's (1988) seminal contribution to the nursing literature on "the use of knowledge" for health promotion provides a useful historical and theoretical foundation for evaluation of current and future directions for intervention research to promote health behavior change. The influence of underlying assumptions regarding health and illness, theoretical and empirical definitions of health and illness behavior, national and international prevention initiatives instituted since the 1 970s, and the political agenda "driving" health policy and research funding decisions are also considered. Building on these foundational perspectives, selected models and constructs which were developed and tested prior to and during the early 1980s (Health Belief Model, Social Cognitive Learning Theory, Theory of Reasoned Action) and subsequent conceptual adaptations and new models (Health Promotion Model, Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, Resource Model, Transtheoretical Model) will be highlighted. Although numerous conceptual and methodological issues require continued attention, there has been considerable progress toward the identification of key elements and/or common constructs across the range of models which are predictive of health behavior (benefits, self-efficacy, intention, social norms, environment, motivation). Continued scholarly inquiry and critical evaluation of theoretical foundations and multidisciplinary perspectives are required to better prepare nurse scientists to face the challenges of health promotion research in the 21st century.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:26Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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