2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166063
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application Of The Transtheoretical Model
Author(s):
Felton, Gwen
Author Details:
Gwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu
Abstract:
The purposes of this paper are to: 1) describe the Transtheoretical Model (stages of change) and the application of the model constructs to health behavior change, 2) describe the usefulness of the model in designing interventions to promote physical activity in young adult African American women, and 3) address the measurement issues related to the various stages of change in physical activity patterns. In the early 80's Prochaska and DiClemente (1982) developed the stages of change model as a framework to describe the various steps associated with acquisition and maintenance of a behavior. The various stages include pre-contemplation (no intentional change), contemplation (serious consideration), preparation (making small changes), action (actively engages in change), and maintenance (sustaining the change over time). Movement through the various stages is cyclical often requiring several attempts before reaching maintenance. When relapse occurs individuals may recycle back through various stages. The transtheoretical model consists of 10 processes of change that individuals use as strategies to get through the different phases of change (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983). The model is most applicable for intervention studies as identification of the group or populations stage of change can assist interventionist in tailoring or matching an intervention to the specific needs of the population. For our current study, the investigators conducted three focus groups and surveyed 75 participants to obtain an impression of the population's various stages of change. The participants were in the pre-contemplation and contemplation stages of behavior change. The application of these findings in the design of a unique physical activity intervention will be addressed. And lastly, instrumentation issues such as availability of exiting scales and their measurement properties will be discussed. Application of the transtheoretical model to intervention research on health behavior may generate important information that will assist individuals to move more quickly through the behavior change process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication Of The Transtheoretical Modelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Gwenen_US
dc.author.detailsGwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166063-
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this paper are to: 1) describe the Transtheoretical Model (stages of change) and the application of the model constructs to health behavior change, 2) describe the usefulness of the model in designing interventions to promote physical activity in young adult African American women, and 3) address the measurement issues related to the various stages of change in physical activity patterns. In the early 80's Prochaska and DiClemente (1982) developed the stages of change model as a framework to describe the various steps associated with acquisition and maintenance of a behavior. The various stages include pre-contemplation (no intentional change), contemplation (serious consideration), preparation (making small changes), action (actively engages in change), and maintenance (sustaining the change over time). Movement through the various stages is cyclical often requiring several attempts before reaching maintenance. When relapse occurs individuals may recycle back through various stages. The transtheoretical model consists of 10 processes of change that individuals use as strategies to get through the different phases of change (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983). The model is most applicable for intervention studies as identification of the group or populations stage of change can assist interventionist in tailoring or matching an intervention to the specific needs of the population. For our current study, the investigators conducted three focus groups and surveyed 75 participants to obtain an impression of the population's various stages of change. The participants were in the pre-contemplation and contemplation stages of behavior change. The application of these findings in the design of a unique physical activity intervention will be addressed. And lastly, instrumentation issues such as availability of exiting scales and their measurement properties will be discussed. Application of the transtheoretical model to intervention research on health behavior may generate important information that will assist individuals to move more quickly through the behavior change process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:27Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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