2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166064
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development Of An Instrument To Measure Spiritual Needs Of Dying Patients
Author(s):
Hermann, Carla
Author Details:
Carla Hermann, PhD, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: carla.hermann@louisville.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure spiritual needs of dying patients. This research addressed the need for an instrument to use in both the research and clinical settings to identify specific spiritual needs of individuals in their last stage of life. The goal was to develop and test an instrument that was specific to the dying patient, that defined spirituality more broadly than religion, and that would provide direction as to appropriate interventions for spiritual needs. This study consisted of two phases. Phase one, the qualitative portion of the study, consisted of structured interviews of 19 hospice patients to identify their perceptions of the word spiritual and needs they had related to their spirituality. Data were analyzed and reduced into codes and themes. Thirty different spiritual needs were identified which were grouped into six themes: the need for religion, companionship, finish business, involvement and control, experience nature, and positive outlook. The results of phase one were used to construct items for the Spiritual Needs Inventory (SNI). In phase two, the quantitative portion of the study, the SNI was administered to l00 hospice patients. Psychometric testing of the SNI included examination of reliability via internal consistency and examination of validity via content and construct validity. Item to total correlation analysis and factor analysis resulted in a 17 item SNI with five sub-scales which explained 63.7 percent of the variance. Cronbach's coefficient alpha for the 17 item SNI was 0.85. Correlations between the sub-scales were low. Data obtained from this sample of 100 were analyzed. These subjects indicated they needed the items on the SNI to a great extent. The needs that subjects reported as unmet most often were related to the presence of others such as family and friends or were related to functional status such as attending religious services. There were significant differences in subjects' responses to the SNI for the demographic variables of gender, education, and place of residence. The results of psychometric testing of the SNI support reliability and validity of the instrument. Before health professionals can intervene meaningfully to meet the spiritual needs of dying patients, there is a need for a reliable and valid instrument to measure the spiritual needs of this population. The development of the SNI should stimulate discussion on the conceptualization and measurement of spiritual needs. Dissemination of these findings may allow other researchers to contribute to the testing of the SNI which would further the psychometric evaluation of the instrument.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment Of An Instrument To Measure Spiritual Needs Of Dying Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHermann, Carlaen_US
dc.author.detailsCarla Hermann, PhD, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: carla.hermann@louisville.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166064-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure spiritual needs of dying patients. This research addressed the need for an instrument to use in both the research and clinical settings to identify specific spiritual needs of individuals in their last stage of life. The goal was to develop and test an instrument that was specific to the dying patient, that defined spirituality more broadly than religion, and that would provide direction as to appropriate interventions for spiritual needs. This study consisted of two phases. Phase one, the qualitative portion of the study, consisted of structured interviews of 19 hospice patients to identify their perceptions of the word spiritual and needs they had related to their spirituality. Data were analyzed and reduced into codes and themes. Thirty different spiritual needs were identified which were grouped into six themes: the need for religion, companionship, finish business, involvement and control, experience nature, and positive outlook. The results of phase one were used to construct items for the Spiritual Needs Inventory (SNI). In phase two, the quantitative portion of the study, the SNI was administered to l00 hospice patients. Psychometric testing of the SNI included examination of reliability via internal consistency and examination of validity via content and construct validity. Item to total correlation analysis and factor analysis resulted in a 17 item SNI with five sub-scales which explained 63.7 percent of the variance. Cronbach's coefficient alpha for the 17 item SNI was 0.85. Correlations between the sub-scales were low. Data obtained from this sample of 100 were analyzed. These subjects indicated they needed the items on the SNI to a great extent. The needs that subjects reported as unmet most often were related to the presence of others such as family and friends or were related to functional status such as attending religious services. There were significant differences in subjects' responses to the SNI for the demographic variables of gender, education, and place of residence. The results of psychometric testing of the SNI support reliability and validity of the instrument. Before health professionals can intervene meaningfully to meet the spiritual needs of dying patients, there is a need for a reliable and valid instrument to measure the spiritual needs of this population. The development of the SNI should stimulate discussion on the conceptualization and measurement of spiritual needs. Dissemination of these findings may allow other researchers to contribute to the testing of the SNI which would further the psychometric evaluation of the instrument.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:29Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.