Perceived Deprivation And Preoccupation With Food Scales: Assessment Of Validity And Reliability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166065
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Deprivation And Preoccupation With Food Scales: Assessment Of Validity And Reliability
Author(s):
Timmerman, Gayle
Author Details:
Gayle Timmerman, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gtimmerman@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Dieting may promote perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food. Perceived deprivation, the perception that specific types or amounts of food are restricted resulting in feeling unsatisfied with one's food intake, is postulated to play a central role in triggering binge eating. Since non-purge binge eating (the uncontrolled consumption of large amounts of food in a discrete period without subsequent purging) is a significant problem in the obese population, it is important to identify binge triggers. The purpose of this presentation to examine the validity and reliability of an instrument developed to measure perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food in non-purge binge eating women. The self-selected sample consisted of 20 women (M = 38.5) who were in treatment for their eating behavior and currently engaged in non-purge binge eating. Instruments were distributed by treatment group leaders to those interested in participating. Each respondent completed the Perceived Deprivation Scale, the Preoccupation with Food Scale, the Feeling Deprived Scale, and the Revised Restraint Scale. The scales tested were designed to measure perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food over the last 24 hours. Perceived Deprivation Scale consists of three items, while the Preoccupation with Food Scale consists of four items. Both scales use a 100 mm visual analogue scale format which is useful when frequent, repeated measures are needed. The Perceived Deprivation Scale was significantly correlated to the Feeling Deprived scale (r = .46, p <.05), demonstrating concurrent validity. Internal consistency, assessed using Cronbach's alpha, was .85 for the Perceived Deprivation Scale, .81 for Preoccupation with Food Scale, and .86 for both scales combined. The Revised Restraint Scale, designed to measure dietary restraint or chronic dieting behavior was not significantly correlated to Perceived Deprivation (r =.27, p =.26) or Preoccupation with Food (r =.28, p =.23). Although this finding appears inconsistent with the assumption that dieting leads to perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food, researchers have found that only about 37% of chronic dieters are actually reducing their food intake to lose weight (Lowe, Whitlow & Bellwoar, 1991). Perhaps the actual limiting of food amounts or types may be needed to trigger feelings of deprivation and preoccupation with food rather than just chronic dieting behavior which may or may not result in actual food restrictions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Deprivation And Preoccupation With Food Scales: Assessment Of Validity And Reliabilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTimmerman, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsGayle Timmerman, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gtimmerman@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166065-
dc.description.abstractDieting may promote perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food. Perceived deprivation, the perception that specific types or amounts of food are restricted resulting in feeling unsatisfied with one's food intake, is postulated to play a central role in triggering binge eating. Since non-purge binge eating (the uncontrolled consumption of large amounts of food in a discrete period without subsequent purging) is a significant problem in the obese population, it is important to identify binge triggers. The purpose of this presentation to examine the validity and reliability of an instrument developed to measure perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food in non-purge binge eating women. The self-selected sample consisted of 20 women (M = 38.5) who were in treatment for their eating behavior and currently engaged in non-purge binge eating. Instruments were distributed by treatment group leaders to those interested in participating. Each respondent completed the Perceived Deprivation Scale, the Preoccupation with Food Scale, the Feeling Deprived Scale, and the Revised Restraint Scale. The scales tested were designed to measure perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food over the last 24 hours. Perceived Deprivation Scale consists of three items, while the Preoccupation with Food Scale consists of four items. Both scales use a 100 mm visual analogue scale format which is useful when frequent, repeated measures are needed. The Perceived Deprivation Scale was significantly correlated to the Feeling Deprived scale (r = .46, p <.05), demonstrating concurrent validity. Internal consistency, assessed using Cronbach's alpha, was .85 for the Perceived Deprivation Scale, .81 for Preoccupation with Food Scale, and .86 for both scales combined. The Revised Restraint Scale, designed to measure dietary restraint or chronic dieting behavior was not significantly correlated to Perceived Deprivation (r =.27, p =.26) or Preoccupation with Food (r =.28, p =.23). Although this finding appears inconsistent with the assumption that dieting leads to perceived deprivation and preoccupation with food, researchers have found that only about 37% of chronic dieters are actually reducing their food intake to lose weight (Lowe, Whitlow & Bellwoar, 1991). Perhaps the actual limiting of food amounts or types may be needed to trigger feelings of deprivation and preoccupation with food rather than just chronic dieting behavior which may or may not result in actual food restrictions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:30Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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