Evaluating Methods For Assessing The Subjective Perspectives Of Persons With Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166066
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating Methods For Assessing The Subjective Perspectives Of Persons With Dementia
Author(s):
Russell, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Russell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee-Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: crussell@uthsc.edu
Abstract:
There has been limited attention to evaluating and refining research methods for eliciting the subjective perspectives of persons with dementia (PWD). As the numbers of PWD increase, researchers must identify methods that are useful in eliciting their perspectives. The research question of this descriptive, ethnographic study was: How reliable, valid, and trustworthy are specific methods for accessing the subjective perspectives of PWD? A combined lifespan development and symbolic interaction framework guided this study. PWD were viewed as creative agents, capable of making meaning and interacting meaningfully with their environment. Participants were 69 PWD who attended an Alzheimer's Day Care Center in the Mid-South. Of the 69 participants, 26 were men and 43 were women, 12 were Black and 57 were White. One researcher spent approximately 3 hours/week for 10 months at the Center, using participant observation, interviewing by comment, and informal interviews to observe and interact with PWD. Another researcher administered the Geriatric Depression Screen-Short Form (GDS-SF), Dementia Mood Picture Test (DMPT), and Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) to a subset of 30 participants. SPMSQ results indicated severe cognitive impairment (M/SD=8/1 .8). The GDS-SF and DMPT were reliable, positively correlated with each other (p=0.004), not correlated with the SPMSQ, and administered in an average of 5 minutes, even given participants' severe cognitive impairments. The adequacy and appropriateness of the qualitative data collection methods for eliciting findings that were credible, dependable, and transferable will be illustrated using case studies from the data. Method triangulation (participant observation, interviewing by stimulus, informal interviews) and prolonged observation (105 hours/10 months) facilitated the collection of perspectives in action (activities and behaviors) and perspectives of action (verbalizations and explanations) of PWD. Using multiple methods, trustworthy data were elicited from participants, even those who were severely cognitively impaired. Participants demonstrated their knowledge and creativity, as they read others' subtle movements, made inferences about others' intentions or desires, drew conclusions based on their observations and mental deliberations, and acted on those judgments. Reviewing the data revealed that if the researcher had used only one method of collecting data or had shortened the data collection period there would have been limited opportunities for PWD to reveal their knowledge, creativity, and potentials. The study results reinforce efforts that, are directed toward eliciting the subjective perspectives of PWD, versus assuming that their perspectives are unobtainable. While the subjective world of PWD may not be completely accessible, attempts to make successive approximations to their subjective world may result in insights that can be used to improve the quality of care and quality of life of the millions of persons who live with dementia.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating Methods For Assessing The Subjective Perspectives Of Persons With Dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Russell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee-Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: crussell@uthsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166066-
dc.description.abstractThere has been limited attention to evaluating and refining research methods for eliciting the subjective perspectives of persons with dementia (PWD). As the numbers of PWD increase, researchers must identify methods that are useful in eliciting their perspectives. The research question of this descriptive, ethnographic study was: How reliable, valid, and trustworthy are specific methods for accessing the subjective perspectives of PWD? A combined lifespan development and symbolic interaction framework guided this study. PWD were viewed as creative agents, capable of making meaning and interacting meaningfully with their environment. Participants were 69 PWD who attended an Alzheimer's Day Care Center in the Mid-South. Of the 69 participants, 26 were men and 43 were women, 12 were Black and 57 were White. One researcher spent approximately 3 hours/week for 10 months at the Center, using participant observation, interviewing by comment, and informal interviews to observe and interact with PWD. Another researcher administered the Geriatric Depression Screen-Short Form (GDS-SF), Dementia Mood Picture Test (DMPT), and Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) to a subset of 30 participants. SPMSQ results indicated severe cognitive impairment (M/SD=8/1 .8). The GDS-SF and DMPT were reliable, positively correlated with each other (p=0.004), not correlated with the SPMSQ, and administered in an average of 5 minutes, even given participants' severe cognitive impairments. The adequacy and appropriateness of the qualitative data collection methods for eliciting findings that were credible, dependable, and transferable will be illustrated using case studies from the data. Method triangulation (participant observation, interviewing by stimulus, informal interviews) and prolonged observation (105 hours/10 months) facilitated the collection of perspectives in action (activities and behaviors) and perspectives of action (verbalizations and explanations) of PWD. Using multiple methods, trustworthy data were elicited from participants, even those who were severely cognitively impaired. Participants demonstrated their knowledge and creativity, as they read others' subtle movements, made inferences about others' intentions or desires, drew conclusions based on their observations and mental deliberations, and acted on those judgments. Reviewing the data revealed that if the researcher had used only one method of collecting data or had shortened the data collection period there would have been limited opportunities for PWD to reveal their knowledge, creativity, and potentials. The study results reinforce efforts that, are directed toward eliciting the subjective perspectives of PWD, versus assuming that their perspectives are unobtainable. While the subjective world of PWD may not be completely accessible, attempts to make successive approximations to their subjective world may result in insights that can be used to improve the quality of care and quality of life of the millions of persons who live with dementia.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:31Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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