Correlates Or Burden And Quality Of Life (QoL) In Family Caregivers Of Renal Transplant Candidates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166068
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates Or Burden And Quality Of Life (QoL) In Family Caregivers Of Renal Transplant Candidates
Author(s):
Wicks, Mona
Author Details:
Mona Wicks, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee/Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: mwicks@uthsc.edu
Abstract:
Research suggests that end-stage renal disease diminishes both patient and family caregiver QoL. Caring for transplant candidates may lead to uncertainty, a lack of predictability, and the persistent threat of death which may contribute to family caregiver burden. One factor that influences QoL is the quality of the caregiver-patient relationship. Chronic caregiving potentially strains this relationship, contributes to burden, and decreases QoL. Neither the level of caregiver burden and QoL nor the relationship between burden and QoL has been described in this population. Thus, the purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the level of burden and QoL reported by family caregivers of renal transplant candidates prior to transplantation. The relationship between burden and QoL and the impact of patient, illness, and caregiver factors on both caregiver burden and QoL were also examined. A model, examining the relationships among caregiver burden and QoL, and the patient, caregiver, and illness factors that potentially influence QoL and burden served as the framework for the study. A sample of 96 caregivers assisting 96 family members (patients) awaiting renal transplantation completed the Caregiver Burden Interview, the GenQoL (a single-item measure of global QoL), and a demographic data form. Patient data were collected from an ongoing study examining their QoL before and following transplantation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, S 's Rank Correlation Coefficients, unpaired t-tests, and nonparametric tests of group differences as appropriate. The majority of caregivers (80%) rated their QoL as excellent or good. In addition, 60% of caregivers reported little to no burden, while 35% reported mild to moderate, and 5% moderate to severe burden. Caregiver QoL was significantly related to caregiver burden (r = -.40, p = .0001) and caregiver self-rated health (r=.67, p=.0001). Increased caregiver burden was also related to poorer self-rated health (r = -.24, p = .02). Caregivers experienced similar levels of burden regardless of whether or not the patient was on dialysis. Although caregivers of patients with diabetes experienced more burden than caregivers of patients without diabetes (p=.01), caregiver QoL did not differ by diabetes status (p = .53). Neither caregiver race, gender, employment category, relationship to the patient, nor dialysis type significantly contributed to burden. In contrast, QoL was significantly different by employment status (p= .10) and approached significant differences by dialysis type (p = .12). These findings document the linkages among burden, QoL, and self-rated health as well as illness factors such as patient diabetes status. Knowledge about these relationships may facilitate the development of interventions that enhance patient and family outcomes. Future analysis will provide insight regarding the influence of transplantation on caregiver burden and QoL.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates Or Burden And Quality Of Life (QoL) In Family Caregivers Of Renal Transplant Candidatesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWicks, Monaen_US
dc.author.detailsMona Wicks, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee/Memphis College of Nursing, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: mwicks@uthsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166068-
dc.description.abstractResearch suggests that end-stage renal disease diminishes both patient and family caregiver QoL. Caring for transplant candidates may lead to uncertainty, a lack of predictability, and the persistent threat of death which may contribute to family caregiver burden. One factor that influences QoL is the quality of the caregiver-patient relationship. Chronic caregiving potentially strains this relationship, contributes to burden, and decreases QoL. Neither the level of caregiver burden and QoL nor the relationship between burden and QoL has been described in this population. Thus, the purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the level of burden and QoL reported by family caregivers of renal transplant candidates prior to transplantation. The relationship between burden and QoL and the impact of patient, illness, and caregiver factors on both caregiver burden and QoL were also examined. A model, examining the relationships among caregiver burden and QoL, and the patient, caregiver, and illness factors that potentially influence QoL and burden served as the framework for the study. A sample of 96 caregivers assisting 96 family members (patients) awaiting renal transplantation completed the Caregiver Burden Interview, the GenQoL (a single-item measure of global QoL), and a demographic data form. Patient data were collected from an ongoing study examining their QoL before and following transplantation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, S 's Rank Correlation Coefficients, unpaired t-tests, and nonparametric tests of group differences as appropriate. The majority of caregivers (80%) rated their QoL as excellent or good. In addition, 60% of caregivers reported little to no burden, while 35% reported mild to moderate, and 5% moderate to severe burden. Caregiver QoL was significantly related to caregiver burden (r = -.40, p = .0001) and caregiver self-rated health (r=.67, p=.0001). Increased caregiver burden was also related to poorer self-rated health (r = -.24, p = .02). Caregivers experienced similar levels of burden regardless of whether or not the patient was on dialysis. Although caregivers of patients with diabetes experienced more burden than caregivers of patients without diabetes (p=.01), caregiver QoL did not differ by diabetes status (p = .53). Neither caregiver race, gender, employment category, relationship to the patient, nor dialysis type significantly contributed to burden. In contrast, QoL was significantly different by employment status (p= .10) and approached significant differences by dialysis type (p = .12). These findings document the linkages among burden, QoL, and self-rated health as well as illness factors such as patient diabetes status. Knowledge about these relationships may facilitate the development of interventions that enhance patient and family outcomes. Future analysis will provide insight regarding the influence of transplantation on caregiver burden and QoL.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:33Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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