2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166070
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue Experienced By Bone Marrow Transplant Patients: An Exploratory Study
Author(s):
Connelly, Lynne
Author Details:
Lynne Connelly, PhD, Dean, University of Texas Health Science Center-San Antonio, School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: connelly@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Fatigue is the most common symptom experienced by cancer patients. Currently, information specific to fatigue during and after bone marrow transplant (BMT) is not available. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine fatigue in BMT patients during and after this life-threatening, potentially curative therapy. Design: An exploratory, descriptive design using interview and diary data examine the experience of fatigue from the informant's hospital admission to one month after discharge. The research questions are: How is fatigue described by BMT patients at various stages of their BMT episode and one month after discharge? How do BMT patients' expectations of fatigue and its effects on their lives after BMT compare to their actual experiences? Sample: The sample consists of 25 patients between the ages of 27 and 68. Most of them are Caucasian (80%), female (76%), have metastatic breast cancer (68%), received previous chemotherapy (96%), surgery (76%), or radiation therapy (44%), have some college education (75%), and are employed full-time (48%). Most informants are married (96%) with 1 to 3 children living at home. The most common BMT regimen was Taxol, Cisplatinum, and Cytoxan (56%). The average length of stay in the bone marrow transplant unit was 27 days, with all informants complaining of some level of fatigue. Data Collection: Upon admission to the hospital, informed consent was obtained. A demographic data sheet was completed and the first interview was conducted to explore past experiences with cancer-related fatigue and informants' expectations of the BMT experience. Informants maintained a diary of their experience with fatigue during hospitalization. Each informant was interviewed approximately 45 days post-BMT about their experience with fatigue after hospital discharge and various coping mechanisms. Data Analysis: Descriptive, qualitative text analysis is being used to develop a full description of BMT fatigue. Data is transcribed and entered into The Ethnograph. Further iterative analysis is being conducted to explore themes and patterns in the data. Member-checking, peer-debriefing and audit procedures ensure methodological rigor. Preliminary Findings: Fatigue during and after BMT is a particularly intense experience compared to past cancer-related fatigue. Many patients stated they had no idea of what to expect in terms of fatigue. To cope, they tend to compartmentalize the experience, with the return to "normal activities" (housekeeping, exercise, shopping, working) being the marker of recovery. Maintaining adequate sleep, eating, and exercise was important to "just getting through" the fatigue. Many informants were particularly sensitive to the amount of noise and activity of hospital staff during their hospitalization. Once awakened, they could not easily return to sleep and this set up a cycle of more fatigue and further disrupted sleep patterns. Family and care providers were both helpful and not helpful in coping with fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue Experienced By Bone Marrow Transplant Patients: An Exploratory Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Lynneen_US
dc.author.detailsLynne Connelly, PhD, Dean, University of Texas Health Science Center-San Antonio, School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: connelly@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166070-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Fatigue is the most common symptom experienced by cancer patients. Currently, information specific to fatigue during and after bone marrow transplant (BMT) is not available. The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine fatigue in BMT patients during and after this life-threatening, potentially curative therapy. Design: An exploratory, descriptive design using interview and diary data examine the experience of fatigue from the informant's hospital admission to one month after discharge. The research questions are: How is fatigue described by BMT patients at various stages of their BMT episode and one month after discharge? How do BMT patients' expectations of fatigue and its effects on their lives after BMT compare to their actual experiences? Sample: The sample consists of 25 patients between the ages of 27 and 68. Most of them are Caucasian (80%), female (76%), have metastatic breast cancer (68%), received previous chemotherapy (96%), surgery (76%), or radiation therapy (44%), have some college education (75%), and are employed full-time (48%). Most informants are married (96%) with 1 to 3 children living at home. The most common BMT regimen was Taxol, Cisplatinum, and Cytoxan (56%). The average length of stay in the bone marrow transplant unit was 27 days, with all informants complaining of some level of fatigue. Data Collection: Upon admission to the hospital, informed consent was obtained. A demographic data sheet was completed and the first interview was conducted to explore past experiences with cancer-related fatigue and informants' expectations of the BMT experience. Informants maintained a diary of their experience with fatigue during hospitalization. Each informant was interviewed approximately 45 days post-BMT about their experience with fatigue after hospital discharge and various coping mechanisms. Data Analysis: Descriptive, qualitative text analysis is being used to develop a full description of BMT fatigue. Data is transcribed and entered into The Ethnograph. Further iterative analysis is being conducted to explore themes and patterns in the data. Member-checking, peer-debriefing and audit procedures ensure methodological rigor. Preliminary Findings: Fatigue during and after BMT is a particularly intense experience compared to past cancer-related fatigue. Many patients stated they had no idea of what to expect in terms of fatigue. To cope, they tend to compartmentalize the experience, with the return to "normal activities" (housekeeping, exercise, shopping, working) being the marker of recovery. Maintaining adequate sleep, eating, and exercise was important to "just getting through" the fatigue. Many informants were particularly sensitive to the amount of noise and activity of hospital staff during their hospitalization. Once awakened, they could not easily return to sleep and this set up a cycle of more fatigue and further disrupted sleep patterns. Family and care providers were both helpful and not helpful in coping with fatigue.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:36Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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