2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166071
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personal Control In Liver Transplant Recipients: A Comparison Of Instruments
Author(s):
Chappell, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Chappell, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Specialist, University of Texas-Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: CHAPPELL@UTA.EDU
Abstract:
Problem: For transplant recipients, life includes adherence to complex and demanding life style changes. Adherence with complex medical regimens is thought to be linked to personal control. No published measures of personal control were found. This study examined the validity and reliability of an unpublished measure of personal control when compared with two standardized approaches. Methods: A convenience sample of 58 adult liver transplant recipients who were admitted to a large metropolitan medical center for either a 1, 2,5, or 10 year follow-up appointment completed three instruments: 1) a personal control visual analogue scale (VAS); 2) the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Form A; and 3) the Snow Personal Control Inventory (SPCI). Results: Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency for the total SPCI instrument was .94 evidencing good reliability. The SPCI correlated well with the VAS (r=.568, p<.001) and supports the validity of the SPCI. The SPCI did not correlate well with the MHLC (r=-.083, p=.53). Since the MHLC was based on Rotter's concept of locus of control, personal control and locus of control may be different phenomena. Conclusions: The VAS and SPCI's significant correlation suggests that these instruments are both measuring personal control. The MHLC is not significantly correlated with the SPCI suggesting that the MHLC is measuring something else. Use of the VAS and SPCI needs to be investigated in larger samples. Implications: The role of personal control and transplant recipients' adherence to complex medical regimens needs further investigation. Personal control has the potential for being an important variable for patients related to their care. Nurses can empower recipients to care for themselves through supporting personal control.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonal Control In Liver Transplant Recipients: A Comparison Of Instrumentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Chappell, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Specialist, University of Texas-Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: CHAPPELL@UTA.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166071-
dc.description.abstractProblem: For transplant recipients, life includes adherence to complex and demanding life style changes. Adherence with complex medical regimens is thought to be linked to personal control. No published measures of personal control were found. This study examined the validity and reliability of an unpublished measure of personal control when compared with two standardized approaches. Methods: A convenience sample of 58 adult liver transplant recipients who were admitted to a large metropolitan medical center for either a 1, 2,5, or 10 year follow-up appointment completed three instruments: 1) a personal control visual analogue scale (VAS); 2) the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Form A; and 3) the Snow Personal Control Inventory (SPCI). Results: Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency for the total SPCI instrument was .94 evidencing good reliability. The SPCI correlated well with the VAS (r=.568, p<.001) and supports the validity of the SPCI. The SPCI did not correlate well with the MHLC (r=-.083, p=.53). Since the MHLC was based on Rotter's concept of locus of control, personal control and locus of control may be different phenomena. Conclusions: The VAS and SPCI's significant correlation suggests that these instruments are both measuring personal control. The MHLC is not significantly correlated with the SPCI suggesting that the MHLC is measuring something else. Use of the VAS and SPCI needs to be investigated in larger samples. Implications: The role of personal control and transplant recipients' adherence to complex medical regimens needs further investigation. Personal control has the potential for being an important variable for patients related to their care. Nurses can empower recipients to care for themselves through supporting personal control.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:37Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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