2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166073
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weight Management Methods Of Mexican-American Women
Author(s):
Allan, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Allan, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: allanj@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Of central concern to research and practice in women's health is the increasing incidence and high prevalence of overweight and obesity. Currently in the US, over 35% of all women and 47% of Mexican-American women are overweight. Mexican-American women in Texas have three times the prevalence rates of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus than Euro-American women. This paper uses data from multiple intensive interviews with 40 Mexican-American lower and higher social status women to describe the weight management methods used by participants and the factors that influence the use of these methods. Data reported are one aspect of a larger m multi-ethnic study of weight. An ecological-cultural conceptual approach enabled examination of women's weight management methods within the environmental milieus in which they conducted their lives. Weight management methods are conceptualized as all behavioral, cognitive and emotional efforts to deal with weight. A naturalistic study design using intensive interviewing techniques and anthropometric measures of height, weight and skinfold thickness were employed. Snowball and purposive sampling techniques were used to reach a non-clinical sample of 40 Mexican-American women. A semi-structured interview was used to collect data over a three-year period. All interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Techniques of domain analysis and constant comparison were used to induct and construct categories of weight management. All participants reported that they had tried to deal with their weight at some time during their life. Two major dimensions of weight management were inducted: weight loss methods and acceptance of weight. A total of 21 types of weight loss methods were identified and classified into three categories: Lifestyle Work, Head Work and Professional Services. In contrast to African-American and Euro-American women in the larger study, Mexican-American women sustained weight loss activities for less time and used fewer Head Work methods. Use of weight loss methods was influenced by age, social status and weight. Older, lower social status and heavier women used more Professional Services than younger, higher social status and thinner women. The study group women (30%) who used acceptance of weight as a management method were heavier and of lower social status than women who did not use this method. Findings from this study contribute a needed body of literature on Latino women and weight management and have implications for nursing research and nursing practice related to health promotion with respect to weight.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeight Management Methods Of Mexican-American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Allan, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: allanj@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166073-
dc.description.abstractOf central concern to research and practice in women's health is the increasing incidence and high prevalence of overweight and obesity. Currently in the US, over 35% of all women and 47% of Mexican-American women are overweight. Mexican-American women in Texas have three times the prevalence rates of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus than Euro-American women. This paper uses data from multiple intensive interviews with 40 Mexican-American lower and higher social status women to describe the weight management methods used by participants and the factors that influence the use of these methods. Data reported are one aspect of a larger m multi-ethnic study of weight. An ecological-cultural conceptual approach enabled examination of women's weight management methods within the environmental milieus in which they conducted their lives. Weight management methods are conceptualized as all behavioral, cognitive and emotional efforts to deal with weight. A naturalistic study design using intensive interviewing techniques and anthropometric measures of height, weight and skinfold thickness were employed. Snowball and purposive sampling techniques were used to reach a non-clinical sample of 40 Mexican-American women. A semi-structured interview was used to collect data over a three-year period. All interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Techniques of domain analysis and constant comparison were used to induct and construct categories of weight management. All participants reported that they had tried to deal with their weight at some time during their life. Two major dimensions of weight management were inducted: weight loss methods and acceptance of weight. A total of 21 types of weight loss methods were identified and classified into three categories: Lifestyle Work, Head Work and Professional Services. In contrast to African-American and Euro-American women in the larger study, Mexican-American women sustained weight loss activities for less time and used fewer Head Work methods. Use of weight loss methods was influenced by age, social status and weight. Older, lower social status and heavier women used more Professional Services than younger, higher social status and thinner women. The study group women (30%) who used acceptance of weight as a management method were heavier and of lower social status than women who did not use this method. Findings from this study contribute a needed body of literature on Latino women and weight management and have implications for nursing research and nursing practice related to health promotion with respect to weight.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:39Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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