Comparison Of Facilitators And Barriers To Exercise For European American And African American Women In The Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166074
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison Of Facilitators And Barriers To Exercise For European American And African American Women In The Community
Author(s):
Nies, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.edu
Abstract:
Little is known about why many women, especially AA women fail to integrate regular exercise into their lifestyles. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe European American (EA) and African-American (AA) women's facilitators and barriers to daily exercise. Four focus groups were conducted, two groups of 8 AA women and two groups of 8 EA women for a total of 32 women. The women self identified as low or middle income, were English speaking, not pregnant, and age 35 to 50. Recruitment was done using fliers and word of mouth. Telephone contact determined eligibility and informed the women of the meeting location. The women signed an informed consent to participate and to have the session audio taped. All women were asked the same questions for example, "for women like yourself what facilitates or makes it easier for you to exercise during your daily life?" A focus group moderator was present during each session. Each of the 4 group sessions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Thematic content analysis was done with the group as the unit of analysis. NUDIST qualitative software was used for data management. Major facilitator themes resulting from the data analysis were: Support, Routine, Home Environment, Weather and Daylight, Health Benefits, Motivation, Weight Loss, Enjoyment, Convenience, Pets, and Variety. The major barrier themes resulting from the data analysis were: Time Constraints, Lack of Commitment, Body Image, Mental Fatigue, Lack of Child Care, Lack of Home Space, and Unsafe Neighborhood. Differences between the facilitators and barriers for EA and the AA women will be discussed. Specific strategies to increase physical activity in EA and AA women in the community will also be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison Of Facilitators And Barriers To Exercise For European American And African American Women In The Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNies, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166074-
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about why many women, especially AA women fail to integrate regular exercise into their lifestyles. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe European American (EA) and African-American (AA) women's facilitators and barriers to daily exercise. Four focus groups were conducted, two groups of 8 AA women and two groups of 8 EA women for a total of 32 women. The women self identified as low or middle income, were English speaking, not pregnant, and age 35 to 50. Recruitment was done using fliers and word of mouth. Telephone contact determined eligibility and informed the women of the meeting location. The women signed an informed consent to participate and to have the session audio taped. All women were asked the same questions for example, "for women like yourself what facilitates or makes it easier for you to exercise during your daily life?" A focus group moderator was present during each session. Each of the 4 group sessions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Thematic content analysis was done with the group as the unit of analysis. NUDIST qualitative software was used for data management. Major facilitator themes resulting from the data analysis were: Support, Routine, Home Environment, Weather and Daylight, Health Benefits, Motivation, Weight Loss, Enjoyment, Convenience, Pets, and Variety. The major barrier themes resulting from the data analysis were: Time Constraints, Lack of Commitment, Body Image, Mental Fatigue, Lack of Child Care, Lack of Home Space, and Unsafe Neighborhood. Differences between the facilitators and barriers for EA and the AA women will be discussed. Specific strategies to increase physical activity in EA and AA women in the community will also be addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:40Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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