2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166075
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comfort Interventions - A Transcultural Study
Author(s):
Wakim, Judith
Author Details:
Judith Wakim, EdD, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA, email: jwakim@mtsu.edu
Abstract:
A study of comfort was conducted in both the USA and Japan. Comfort was defined as a nursing intervention which could help the patient in three ways: 1.) by giving him/her a sense of relief from discomfort, 2.) by placing the him/her in a state of ease, 3.) or by assisting him/her to strengthen quality of life. (Kolkaba, 1991) The objectives of the study were to 1.) assess individual comfort needs related to the three ways of giving comfort, 2.) validate effectiveness of nursing interventions in meeting comfort needs, and 3.) to determine if patients of different cultures perceived differences or similarities in the importance of various comfort measures. A 96-item interview schedule, developed and piloted by the researcher, was used to gather data. Interviewers in the USA were faculty, students and one native Spanish-speaking social worker. Interviewers in Japan were faculty, in-service educators and supervising nurses. Since the schedule was close-ended, training of interviewers was easily accomplished. The interview schedule was translated to Japanese in Japan, returned to the USA and translated to English by two separate native Japanese-speakers and then returned to Japan for final corrections. When the interviewer asked the patient about a particular comfort measure, the patient responded in one of five ways to indicate the importance of that item. The response options were typed in large letters on a card which the patient used for reference during the interview. One hundred sixty USA subjects and 288 Japanese subjects, 18 to 91 years old, were interviewed. All subjects were or had recently been hospitalized or treated in a health care facility for a variety of illnesses, including psychiatric and obstetric care. Responses were tabulated and compared using simple descriptive statistics. The most important comfort measure for the Japanese patient was that the nurse provide "adequate and proper food and fluids". This was number four in importance for the USA patients. Comfort measures identified as second and third in importance to the Japanese patients were "allow uninterrupted sleep during the night" and "use clear, concise, easy to understand statements". The most important comfort measures for the USA patients was to be "treated respectfully", which was number 14 for the Japanese patients. Measures ranking second and third for the USA patients were "monitored my condition appropriately and adequately" and "made me feel like I was being cared for competently". Both Japanese and USA patients felt that nurses should encourage them "to have personal items such as pictures to improve their room's atmosphere", but that was often not done. Both groups of patients also felt that it was important that nurses "give specific facts about progress, but that was not done enough. Information gained from the study not only adds to the nursing profession's body of knowledge, it also gives nurses practical ways to prioritize care for patients so that patient's are more satisfied with their hospital stays.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComfort Interventions - A Transcultural Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWakim, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Wakim, EdD, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA, email: jwakim@mtsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166075-
dc.description.abstractA study of comfort was conducted in both the USA and Japan. Comfort was defined as a nursing intervention which could help the patient in three ways: 1.) by giving him/her a sense of relief from discomfort, 2.) by placing the him/her in a state of ease, 3.) or by assisting him/her to strengthen quality of life. (Kolkaba, 1991) The objectives of the study were to 1.) assess individual comfort needs related to the three ways of giving comfort, 2.) validate effectiveness of nursing interventions in meeting comfort needs, and 3.) to determine if patients of different cultures perceived differences or similarities in the importance of various comfort measures. A 96-item interview schedule, developed and piloted by the researcher, was used to gather data. Interviewers in the USA were faculty, students and one native Spanish-speaking social worker. Interviewers in Japan were faculty, in-service educators and supervising nurses. Since the schedule was close-ended, training of interviewers was easily accomplished. The interview schedule was translated to Japanese in Japan, returned to the USA and translated to English by two separate native Japanese-speakers and then returned to Japan for final corrections. When the interviewer asked the patient about a particular comfort measure, the patient responded in one of five ways to indicate the importance of that item. The response options were typed in large letters on a card which the patient used for reference during the interview. One hundred sixty USA subjects and 288 Japanese subjects, 18 to 91 years old, were interviewed. All subjects were or had recently been hospitalized or treated in a health care facility for a variety of illnesses, including psychiatric and obstetric care. Responses were tabulated and compared using simple descriptive statistics. The most important comfort measure for the Japanese patient was that the nurse provide "adequate and proper food and fluids". This was number four in importance for the USA patients. Comfort measures identified as second and third in importance to the Japanese patients were "allow uninterrupted sleep during the night" and "use clear, concise, easy to understand statements". The most important comfort measures for the USA patients was to be "treated respectfully", which was number 14 for the Japanese patients. Measures ranking second and third for the USA patients were "monitored my condition appropriately and adequately" and "made me feel like I was being cared for competently". Both Japanese and USA patients felt that nurses should encourage them "to have personal items such as pictures to improve their room's atmosphere", but that was often not done. Both groups of patients also felt that it was important that nurses "give specific facts about progress, but that was not done enough. Information gained from the study not only adds to the nursing profession's body of knowledge, it also gives nurses practical ways to prioritize care for patients so that patient's are more satisfied with their hospital stays.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:41Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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