2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166078
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methodological Issues In Meta-synthesis Of Qualitative Research
Author(s):
Powell-Cope, Gail
Author Details:
Gail Powell-Cope, PhD, VISN8 Evidence-based Practice Center, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: gail.powell-cope@va.gov
Abstract:
Meta-synthesis is a process by which interpretations are brought to bear across a group of qualitative studies. Qualitative researchers have been criticized for conducting too many small studies on similar topics that yield similar results, yet we found little direction in the nursing literature for conducting a meta-synthesis. Therefore, based on examples from other disciplines and a few models in nursing, we developed and tested a method to synthesize a body of qualitative research. A basic assumption that guided this synthesis was that qualitative studies about people's experience are crucial in providing direction for practice and research because they provide the emic perspective. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to discuss the process of meta-synthesis and issues that arose when we conducted a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies about people with HIV infection. The purpose of the meta-synthesis was to understand the experience of adults living with HIV infection. The first step was to build a research team with expertise in conducting qualitative research about the subject matter of interest. Extensive computer searches were run, using a wide range of descriptors and multiple data bases, to identify as many published qualitative studies as possible. Any research that was qualitative, published in a referred journal, and dealt with HIV infection or AIDS was retrieved. At this point decisions were made to define boundaries that would reflect the specific purpose of the meta-synthesis. To determine the acceptability of studies we used a group of standards for critiquing qualitative research (Burns, 1989) to develop a four-page check-list reflecting essential elements of qualitative studies. Each article was reviewed to determine quality and those that met a majority of standards were included. The final challenge was to develop overarching metaphors that would account for similarities and dissimilarities across study findings from the 21 studies in the final pool of articles. The goal of analysis was to integrate the entire set of findings into a parsimonious, cogent, powerful and credible whole. Using constant comparative analysis, study themes and categories were coded, compared, and sorted, focusing on their conditions, strategies, and consequences. We "translated" each category in relation to key categories and concepts across studies. Finally, the synthesis was written, revisited and revised until a coherent whole was formed. As more qualitative studies of the human experience of health and illness are conducted, researchers are challenged to develop ways to synthesize findings to provide direction for further research and clinical practice. This paper was intended to stimulate discussion within nursing about the methods to synthesize findings across qualitative studies. Major challenges in conducting this meta-synthesis were developing effective strategies to make sense of a specific body of literature, and remaining focused on the interpretive process without becoming lost in procedural requirements.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethodological Issues In Meta-synthesis Of Qualitative Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPowell-Cope, Gailen_US
dc.author.detailsGail Powell-Cope, PhD, VISN8 Evidence-based Practice Center, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: gail.powell-cope@va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166078-
dc.description.abstractMeta-synthesis is a process by which interpretations are brought to bear across a group of qualitative studies. Qualitative researchers have been criticized for conducting too many small studies on similar topics that yield similar results, yet we found little direction in the nursing literature for conducting a meta-synthesis. Therefore, based on examples from other disciplines and a few models in nursing, we developed and tested a method to synthesize a body of qualitative research. A basic assumption that guided this synthesis was that qualitative studies about people's experience are crucial in providing direction for practice and research because they provide the emic perspective. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to discuss the process of meta-synthesis and issues that arose when we conducted a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies about people with HIV infection. The purpose of the meta-synthesis was to understand the experience of adults living with HIV infection. The first step was to build a research team with expertise in conducting qualitative research about the subject matter of interest. Extensive computer searches were run, using a wide range of descriptors and multiple data bases, to identify as many published qualitative studies as possible. Any research that was qualitative, published in a referred journal, and dealt with HIV infection or AIDS was retrieved. At this point decisions were made to define boundaries that would reflect the specific purpose of the meta-synthesis. To determine the acceptability of studies we used a group of standards for critiquing qualitative research (Burns, 1989) to develop a four-page check-list reflecting essential elements of qualitative studies. Each article was reviewed to determine quality and those that met a majority of standards were included. The final challenge was to develop overarching metaphors that would account for similarities and dissimilarities across study findings from the 21 studies in the final pool of articles. The goal of analysis was to integrate the entire set of findings into a parsimonious, cogent, powerful and credible whole. Using constant comparative analysis, study themes and categories were coded, compared, and sorted, focusing on their conditions, strategies, and consequences. We "translated" each category in relation to key categories and concepts across studies. Finally, the synthesis was written, revisited and revised until a coherent whole was formed. As more qualitative studies of the human experience of health and illness are conducted, researchers are challenged to develop ways to synthesize findings to provide direction for further research and clinical practice. This paper was intended to stimulate discussion within nursing about the methods to synthesize findings across qualitative studies. Major challenges in conducting this meta-synthesis were developing effective strategies to make sense of a specific body of literature, and remaining focused on the interpretive process without becoming lost in procedural requirements.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:45Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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