2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166080
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Discipline Of 3-Year-old Prematurely Born Children
Author(s):
Holditch-Davis, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.edu
Abstract:
Preschool-age children born prematurely experience more learning and behavioral problems than children born at term. This could pose discipline problems for their parents, especially since these parents are known to be more overprotective towards their children. The purposes of this study were to describe the discipline practices of mothers of 3-year-old prematurely born children and to examine the relationships among discipline practices, maternal attitudes about the child and discipline, and maternal education levels. The conceptual framework for this study was Barbara Howard's theory of discipline as involving the structure the adult provides for the child's life, including routines, positive attention, and judicious use of negative control measures. The participants were 53 3-year-old children and their 47 mothers. All children either had a birth weight less than 1500 gm or required mechanical ventilation. Two 2-hour observations of mother-child free play were conducted in the home when the child was 3 years corrected age. The observer completed a HOME Inventory during one of these visits. Two maternal behaviors from the observation-expressing positive effect and attention-and the Emotional and Verbal Responsivity subscale from the HOME were used as measures of positive control. Maternal expression of negative effect from the observation and a revised scoring of the Avoidance of Restriction and Punishment Subscale on the HOME were used as indicators of negative control. The mothers completed a diary on their children's sleep patterns. The standard deviation of the bedtimes was used to operationalize maternal use of consistent bedtimes. A month later, the mothers completed the Vulnerable Child Scale which measures the mothers perceptions of her child's vulnerability to health problems, and they were interviewed about their experiences parenting their children. If mothers mentioned discipline in response to a question on the most difficult aspects of parenting, they were considered to have discipline concerns. Overall, 87% of the mothers used positive control measures more than negative control measures. There were no correlations between bedtime consistency and any of the control measure variables, and the positive and negative control measures were only negatively correlated for the HOME variables. Maternal education level was correlated with perception of vulnerability and with the positive and negative control variables from the HOME and maternal attention from the observation, such that mothers with more education used more positive control strategies and fewer negative control strategies. Maternal perception of child vulnerability was unrelated to the control measures, but related to the bedtime routines, such that a greater sense of vulnerability was associated with greater variability in bedtimes. Twenty-one mothers expressed discipline concerns during the interview. The groups of mothers with and with discipline concerns were compared on the discipline, education, and vulnerability variables using t-tests. Mothers with discipline concerns expressed positive affect more and provided more positive attention than the other mothers. The groups did not differ on education, perceptions of vulnerability, consistency of bedtimes, or use of negative control measures. Thus, the findings partially support Howard's theory. Most mothers use positive control measures more than negative ones, and a higher education levels were related to greater use of positive discipline. However, no relationship between routines and control measures was found. Mothers with discipline concerns tended to use more positive discipline measures, suggesting that mothers of preschool-age children without these concerns may be at greater risk of discipline problems.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Discipline Of 3-Year-old Prematurely Born Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolditch-Davis, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Holditch-Davis, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: diane_hd@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166080-
dc.description.abstractPreschool-age children born prematurely experience more learning and behavioral problems than children born at term. This could pose discipline problems for their parents, especially since these parents are known to be more overprotective towards their children. The purposes of this study were to describe the discipline practices of mothers of 3-year-old prematurely born children and to examine the relationships among discipline practices, maternal attitudes about the child and discipline, and maternal education levels. The conceptual framework for this study was Barbara Howard's theory of discipline as involving the structure the adult provides for the child's life, including routines, positive attention, and judicious use of negative control measures. The participants were 53 3-year-old children and their 47 mothers. All children either had a birth weight less than 1500 gm or required mechanical ventilation. Two 2-hour observations of mother-child free play were conducted in the home when the child was 3 years corrected age. The observer completed a HOME Inventory during one of these visits. Two maternal behaviors from the observation-expressing positive effect and attention-and the Emotional and Verbal Responsivity subscale from the HOME were used as measures of positive control. Maternal expression of negative effect from the observation and a revised scoring of the Avoidance of Restriction and Punishment Subscale on the HOME were used as indicators of negative control. The mothers completed a diary on their children's sleep patterns. The standard deviation of the bedtimes was used to operationalize maternal use of consistent bedtimes. A month later, the mothers completed the Vulnerable Child Scale which measures the mothers perceptions of her child's vulnerability to health problems, and they were interviewed about their experiences parenting their children. If mothers mentioned discipline in response to a question on the most difficult aspects of parenting, they were considered to have discipline concerns. Overall, 87% of the mothers used positive control measures more than negative control measures. There were no correlations between bedtime consistency and any of the control measure variables, and the positive and negative control measures were only negatively correlated for the HOME variables. Maternal education level was correlated with perception of vulnerability and with the positive and negative control variables from the HOME and maternal attention from the observation, such that mothers with more education used more positive control strategies and fewer negative control strategies. Maternal perception of child vulnerability was unrelated to the control measures, but related to the bedtime routines, such that a greater sense of vulnerability was associated with greater variability in bedtimes. Twenty-one mothers expressed discipline concerns during the interview. The groups of mothers with and with discipline concerns were compared on the discipline, education, and vulnerability variables using t-tests. Mothers with discipline concerns expressed positive affect more and provided more positive attention than the other mothers. The groups did not differ on education, perceptions of vulnerability, consistency of bedtimes, or use of negative control measures. Thus, the findings partially support Howard's theory. Most mothers use positive control measures more than negative ones, and a higher education levels were related to greater use of positive discipline. However, no relationship between routines and control measures was found. Mothers with discipline concerns tended to use more positive discipline measures, suggesting that mothers of preschool-age children without these concerns may be at greater risk of discipline problems.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:47Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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