2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166086
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes Associated With Advanced Nursing Practice Prescriptive Authority
Author(s):
Hamric, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Hamric, PhD, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing Graduate Nursing Program, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: ahamri@lsumc.edu
Abstract:
Although 46 states allow advanced practice nurses (APNs) to prescribe medications, the degree of authorization and associated rules and regulations vary widely. Numerous authors have called for more outcome studies to document APN prescribing effectiveness. Thirty-two advanced practice nurses (APNs; the sample including 31 nurse practitioners and one clinical nurse specialist) in 25 different primary care sites in one southern state participated in a study of the safety and effectiveness of APN prescriptive authority. Sites included urban and rural clinics, specialty clinics such as pediatrics, women's health, AIDS, emergency department, and school and college-based clinics. Data were recorded by APN participants for 1,574 patients seen during a two month period. In addition, questionnaires were completed by patients and collaborating physicians at each site. Over 90% of patients seen required prescription medications. The majority of drugs prescribed were in the following categories: antibiotics, decongestants/antihistamines, antivirals, and bronchodilators/antiasthmatics. Outcomes of care were analyzed using four different measures. Patient satisfaction surveys (n=847) indicated a high level of satisfaction with APN care and low waiting times; 98% would choose to see the APN again. Evaluation of patient outcome by APN and MD during follow-up visits (n=683) indicated that in 76% of cases the patient's condition stabilized or improved. Of the patients whose condition worsened or was unchanged, 40% were patients with diagnoses of HIV or AIDS. Patient evaluation of their own outcomes (n=333) indicated that 96% of patients agreed or strongly agreed that the medication and treatment given by the APN helped their problem. Collaborating physicians (n=32) were unanimous in their evaluation of APN prescriptive authority as beneficial to their patients; 31 of 32 physicians agreed or strongly agreed that the APN safely practiced within their legal scope of practice relative to prescribing activities (one had no opinion). The findings demonstrate that APN prescriptive authority is safe and consistent within their scope of practice. This presentation will detail the findings of the study and discuss implications for practice and further research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes Associated With Advanced Nursing Practice Prescriptive Authorityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamric, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Hamric, PhD, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing Graduate Nursing Program, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: ahamri@lsumc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166086-
dc.description.abstractAlthough 46 states allow advanced practice nurses (APNs) to prescribe medications, the degree of authorization and associated rules and regulations vary widely. Numerous authors have called for more outcome studies to document APN prescribing effectiveness. Thirty-two advanced practice nurses (APNs; the sample including 31 nurse practitioners and one clinical nurse specialist) in 25 different primary care sites in one southern state participated in a study of the safety and effectiveness of APN prescriptive authority. Sites included urban and rural clinics, specialty clinics such as pediatrics, women's health, AIDS, emergency department, and school and college-based clinics. Data were recorded by APN participants for 1,574 patients seen during a two month period. In addition, questionnaires were completed by patients and collaborating physicians at each site. Over 90% of patients seen required prescription medications. The majority of drugs prescribed were in the following categories: antibiotics, decongestants/antihistamines, antivirals, and bronchodilators/antiasthmatics. Outcomes of care were analyzed using four different measures. Patient satisfaction surveys (n=847) indicated a high level of satisfaction with APN care and low waiting times; 98% would choose to see the APN again. Evaluation of patient outcome by APN and MD during follow-up visits (n=683) indicated that in 76% of cases the patient's condition stabilized or improved. Of the patients whose condition worsened or was unchanged, 40% were patients with diagnoses of HIV or AIDS. Patient evaluation of their own outcomes (n=333) indicated that 96% of patients agreed or strongly agreed that the medication and treatment given by the APN helped their problem. Collaborating physicians (n=32) were unanimous in their evaluation of APN prescriptive authority as beneficial to their patients; 31 of 32 physicians agreed or strongly agreed that the APN safely practiced within their legal scope of practice relative to prescribing activities (one had no opinion). The findings demonstrate that APN prescriptive authority is safe and consistent within their scope of practice. This presentation will detail the findings of the study and discuss implications for practice and further research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:39:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:39:55Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.