2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166093
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Outcomes After Homograft Valve Replacement
Author(s):
Warner, Christi
Author Details:
Christi Warner, PhD, Crawford Long Hospital of Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: christideatonpa@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Abstract:
Because of their potential for durability, excellent hemodynamic profile and no need for anticoagulation, homograft valves may enhance patient activity and quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to determine outcome for 69 homograft valve patients followed 5.9 ( 2.7 years after surgery. Age at surgery was at 48 ( 15 (range 16-72) and ejection fraction was 55 ( 11. Approximately one third (34%) of the patients were female, 33% had hypertension, 21% had heart failure, and 9% were diabetic. Males and females differed by smoking status (7% of the males smoked vs. 27% of the females, p< 0.023). Females tended to be older, and have higher ejection fractions than the men. At follow-up, 57 were alive, five were dead, one was explanted, and six were not contacted. Five year survival for females was 89% and for males 97% (p< 0.13) Most patients (65%) were working. Twelve patients (35% of the females vs. 15% of the males, p< 0.09) had been re-hospitalized. Quality of life was compared between males and females using the Health Status Questionnaire - 12 (HSQ-12). Lower scores indicating poorer functioning were found for females verses males on physical functioning and health perception (see table below). Age was not shown to correlate with health perception and physical functioning scores. MaleFemale p value Health perception 75 ( 2458 ( 270.016 Physical functioning 81 ( 2563 ( 340.032 Walk Several Blocks 87 ( 2561 ( 370.012 Walk Flights of stairs 74 ( 3356 ( 380.076 Carry groceries 82 ( 3264 ( 380.061 Conclusions: Five year survival is excellent and quality of life for males is good. Females tend to have poorer survival, higher rates of re-hospitalization, and poorer quality of life. The finding in females is of concern, given that baseline characteristics are similar for males and females. Research is needed to determine the factors affecting outcomes in women after homograft valve replacement, and to test interventions that improve quality of life and survival for women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Outcomes After Homograft Valve Replacementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Christien_US
dc.author.detailsChristi Warner, PhD, Crawford Long Hospital of Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: christideatonpa@medschl.cam.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166093-
dc.description.abstractBecause of their potential for durability, excellent hemodynamic profile and no need for anticoagulation, homograft valves may enhance patient activity and quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to determine outcome for 69 homograft valve patients followed 5.9 ( 2.7 years after surgery. Age at surgery was at 48 ( 15 (range 16-72) and ejection fraction was 55 ( 11. Approximately one third (34%) of the patients were female, 33% had hypertension, 21% had heart failure, and 9% were diabetic. Males and females differed by smoking status (7% of the males smoked vs. 27% of the females, p< 0.023). Females tended to be older, and have higher ejection fractions than the men. At follow-up, 57 were alive, five were dead, one was explanted, and six were not contacted. Five year survival for females was 89% and for males 97% (p< 0.13) Most patients (65%) were working. Twelve patients (35% of the females vs. 15% of the males, p< 0.09) had been re-hospitalized. Quality of life was compared between males and females using the Health Status Questionnaire - 12 (HSQ-12). Lower scores indicating poorer functioning were found for females verses males on physical functioning and health perception (see table below). Age was not shown to correlate with health perception and physical functioning scores. MaleFemale p value Health perception 75 ( 2458 ( 270.016 Physical functioning 81 ( 2563 ( 340.032 Walk Several Blocks 87 ( 2561 ( 370.012 Walk Flights of stairs 74 ( 3356 ( 380.076 Carry groceries 82 ( 3264 ( 380.061 Conclusions: Five year survival is excellent and quality of life for males is good. Females tend to have poorer survival, higher rates of re-hospitalization, and poorer quality of life. The finding in females is of concern, given that baseline characteristics are similar for males and females. Research is needed to determine the factors affecting outcomes in women after homograft valve replacement, and to test interventions that improve quality of life and survival for women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:04Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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