2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166095
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age Appropriate Estimates Of Physical Activity In Rural Elders
Author(s):
Allison, Molly
Author Details:
Molly Allison, MSN, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Molly.Walker@angelo.edu
Abstract:
Background: The clear and documented link between physical activity and cardiovascular health is hampered in its application to clinical practice by a lack of tested assessment measures. Clinicians and investigators planning intervention strategies directed towards reduction of health risks need instruments that are accurate and reliable to guide and measure the effects of their interventions. The lack of appropriate or feasible measures for assessing physical activity in elders living in rural settings is particularly notable. Many elders engage in strenuous aerobic activity accomplishing tasks of daily living. Yet do not perceive themselves as "exercising." The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of assessing an instrument for appropriateness in the assessment of physical activity in elderly individuals living in a rural community. Methods: The sample consisted of adults (n=32), 67 to 83 years of age (M=72), who had experienced an acute coronary event and were eligible for cardiac rehabilitation. All lived in a south-central Texas rural community. The instrument assessed for reliability and validity was the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), developed specifically to assess physical activity in individuals 65 years and older. The 32 item questionnaire examines twelve self reported occupational, household and leisure time activities. Results: Reliability of PASE: The stability of the PASE over time was assessed by test-retest reliability correlations between baseline scores and follow-up scores reported 2-3 weeks later, with a reliability coefficient of .72. Assessment of the internal consistency of the PASE was accomplished with Chronbach's alpha, providing the inter-item correlations. In this sample, the coefficient alpha for raw variables was 0.19, and 0.71 for standardized variables. Validity of the PASE Three experts judged the PASE for content validity, and data obtained regarding item agreement was qualified with an application of an index of content validity (CVI). The CVI for the PASE was 0.83. Construct of the PASE was measured by Pearson's Product Moment coefficient correlating physical activity with perceived health. Scatter plots demonstrated a linear relationship between physical activity and perceived health; the correlation coefficient was r = .31, p = .08. The PASE was demonstrated to be a reliable instrument measuring physical activity in elders; however the validity was marginal. It is important to emphasize that this sample was drawn from a rural population with occupations centering on farming, ranching and independent business. These findings suggest that the PASE may not be an acceptable instrument for use in rural, agricultural populations of elders.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge Appropriate Estimates Of Physical Activity In Rural Eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Mollyen_US
dc.author.detailsMolly Allison, MSN, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Molly.Walker@angelo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166095-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The clear and documented link between physical activity and cardiovascular health is hampered in its application to clinical practice by a lack of tested assessment measures. Clinicians and investigators planning intervention strategies directed towards reduction of health risks need instruments that are accurate and reliable to guide and measure the effects of their interventions. The lack of appropriate or feasible measures for assessing physical activity in elders living in rural settings is particularly notable. Many elders engage in strenuous aerobic activity accomplishing tasks of daily living. Yet do not perceive themselves as "exercising." The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of assessing an instrument for appropriateness in the assessment of physical activity in elderly individuals living in a rural community. Methods: The sample consisted of adults (n=32), 67 to 83 years of age (M=72), who had experienced an acute coronary event and were eligible for cardiac rehabilitation. All lived in a south-central Texas rural community. The instrument assessed for reliability and validity was the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), developed specifically to assess physical activity in individuals 65 years and older. The 32 item questionnaire examines twelve self reported occupational, household and leisure time activities. Results: Reliability of PASE: The stability of the PASE over time was assessed by test-retest reliability correlations between baseline scores and follow-up scores reported 2-3 weeks later, with a reliability coefficient of .72. Assessment of the internal consistency of the PASE was accomplished with Chronbach's alpha, providing the inter-item correlations. In this sample, the coefficient alpha for raw variables was 0.19, and 0.71 for standardized variables. Validity of the PASE Three experts judged the PASE for content validity, and data obtained regarding item agreement was qualified with an application of an index of content validity (CVI). The CVI for the PASE was 0.83. Construct of the PASE was measured by Pearson's Product Moment coefficient correlating physical activity with perceived health. Scatter plots demonstrated a linear relationship between physical activity and perceived health; the correlation coefficient was r = .31, p = .08. The PASE was demonstrated to be a reliable instrument measuring physical activity in elders; however the validity was marginal. It is important to emphasize that this sample was drawn from a rural population with occupations centering on farming, ranching and independent business. These findings suggest that the PASE may not be an acceptable instrument for use in rural, agricultural populations of elders.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:06Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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