Social Cognitive Theory: A Framework For Understanding Learning In A Nursing Student-preceptor Relationship (How Nursing Students "Learn By Doing" In The Presence Of A Practicing Nurse)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166099
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Cognitive Theory: A Framework For Understanding Learning In A Nursing Student-preceptor Relationship (How Nursing Students "Learn By Doing" In The Presence Of A Practicing Nurse)
Author(s):
Sandoval, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Sandoval, PhD, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: jbsandov@hamlet.uncg.edu
Abstract:
Schools of nursing use students working with practicing nurses as a teaching method to provide students with an opportunity to practice the roles of nurses in a variety of settings with patients. The purpose of this study was to see if: existing educational theory, Social Cognitive Theory, could serve as a guide for the leaning that takes place when a student works with a nurse rather than their nursing faculty member. The study involved interviewing students in the course, nurses who worked with students, and faculty members who helped coordinate the experience. The questions for the interviews were based on the important ideas from the educational theory. In addition to these interviews, journals kept by six of the students during the course, observations of two students in their clinical settings, and course syllabi of the ten prerequisite nursing courses were used. Study of the data sources indicated that Social Cognitive Theory was an appropriate guide for understanding what was happening in the relationship between the student and the practicing nurse (preceptor). Three factors described by Bandura (1986) when he developed this theory were found to influence student learning. These factors are the environment where the learning takes place, the personal characteristics of the people involved in the relationship, and the behaviors exhibited by these people. It was found that students used the learning they had received in earlier courses and that when they were given a chance to choose where they would have their experience they chose areas where they thought they would be successful. All students were initially nervous, but over time became confident in their abilities. The students who knew what they wanted to get from the course had better experiences. Students who wanted to be able to make a lot of their own decisions chose areas where independent thinking was encouraged. Not all preceptors were described as good role models, but students were able to identify traits they hoped to have as nurses and described both positive and negative things they learned with their preceptors. The role of the faculty member in this course was less valued by students who had helpful relationships with their nurse preceptor and needed less guidance and support from the faculty member. Results of this study suggest that Social Cognitive Theory can be used to explain how a college-based nursing preceptorship helps students develop the skills needed by beginning nurses and how the relationship between students and preceptors helps this development. In addition, this study suggests future directions for study and ideas for course development when a preceptorship model of learning is used.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Cognitive Theory: A Framework For Understanding Learning In A Nursing Student-preceptor Relationship (How Nursing Students "Learn By Doing" In The Presence Of A Practicing Nurse)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSandoval, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Sandoval, PhD, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: jbsandov@hamlet.uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166099-
dc.description.abstractSchools of nursing use students working with practicing nurses as a teaching method to provide students with an opportunity to practice the roles of nurses in a variety of settings with patients. The purpose of this study was to see if: existing educational theory, Social Cognitive Theory, could serve as a guide for the leaning that takes place when a student works with a nurse rather than their nursing faculty member. The study involved interviewing students in the course, nurses who worked with students, and faculty members who helped coordinate the experience. The questions for the interviews were based on the important ideas from the educational theory. In addition to these interviews, journals kept by six of the students during the course, observations of two students in their clinical settings, and course syllabi of the ten prerequisite nursing courses were used. Study of the data sources indicated that Social Cognitive Theory was an appropriate guide for understanding what was happening in the relationship between the student and the practicing nurse (preceptor). Three factors described by Bandura (1986) when he developed this theory were found to influence student learning. These factors are the environment where the learning takes place, the personal characteristics of the people involved in the relationship, and the behaviors exhibited by these people. It was found that students used the learning they had received in earlier courses and that when they were given a chance to choose where they would have their experience they chose areas where they thought they would be successful. All students were initially nervous, but over time became confident in their abilities. The students who knew what they wanted to get from the course had better experiences. Students who wanted to be able to make a lot of their own decisions chose areas where independent thinking was encouraged. Not all preceptors were described as good role models, but students were able to identify traits they hoped to have as nurses and described both positive and negative things they learned with their preceptors. The role of the faculty member in this course was less valued by students who had helpful relationships with their nurse preceptor and needed less guidance and support from the faculty member. Results of this study suggest that Social Cognitive Theory can be used to explain how a college-based nursing preceptorship helps students develop the skills needed by beginning nurses and how the relationship between students and preceptors helps this development. In addition, this study suggests future directions for study and ideas for course development when a preceptorship model of learning is used.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:11Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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