Comparison Of Anger And Anger Expression Scores In Children Enrolled In High Intensity Sports Programs Versus Those In Low Intensity Or Not Enrolled

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166103
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison Of Anger And Anger Expression Scores In Children Enrolled In High Intensity Sports Programs Versus Those In Low Intensity Or Not Enrolled
Author(s):
Rice, Marti
Author Details:
Marti Rice, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Alabama School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: RICEM@ADMIN.SON.UAB.EDU
Abstract:
The effects of physical activity on anger and anger expression has been studied in adults, but few studies have examined this in children. This study involved secondary analysis of data collected in the first year of a four-year investigation of the influence of selected physiological and psychological factors on blood pressure in children. The purpose of this study was to compare the state/trait anger and patterns of anger expression scores (anger out, anger suppression, and anger reflection/control) of third grade children who were enrolled in high intensity sports programs with those in low intensity sports programs or those not enrolled. The following research questions were addressed: What are the differences in anger and patterns of anger expression scores between children enrolled in high intensity sports programs and those not enrolled; and What are gender or ethnic differences in anger and patterns of anger expression scores in children enrolled in high intensity sports programs versus those not enrolled? From five elementary schools in a large southeastern school district, the original sample of 230 children were enrolled based on consent of parent/guardian and child, being able to read and understand English and parental completion of survey. After parents had completed an investigator prepared Health History and General Information Survey, participants completed the Jacobs Pediatric Anger Scale and the Jacobs Pediatric Anger Expression Scale. One hundred ninety eight participants completed information about participation in organized sports. One hundred nineteen (49.6%) participated and 79(32.9%) did not participate in organized sports. There were significantly lower mean Trait Anger scores and mean Anger Out scores in those who participated than those who didn't. When participants were grouped according to high intensity and low intensity or no involvement and analyzed by gender and/or race, significant differences in State and Trait Anger scores were found between Black and White participants. Additionally, females and White participants had significantly higher mean Anger Reflection/Control scores; Black participants had significantly higher mean Anger Out scores. When the interaction of race and intensity of activity was considered, White participants in high intensity sports programs had significantly higher Anger Reflection/Control scores. Anger and anger expression in children may be influenced by participation in sports programs and the intensity of those programs. If findings are verified by further research, high activity sports may be viewed as an effective means of dealing with anger in children and may further reduce the incidence of anger related diseases.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison Of Anger And Anger Expression Scores In Children Enrolled In High Intensity Sports Programs Versus Those In Low Intensity Or Not Enrolleden_GB
dc.contributor.authorRice, Martien_US
dc.author.detailsMarti Rice, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Alabama School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: RICEM@ADMIN.SON.UAB.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166103-
dc.description.abstractThe effects of physical activity on anger and anger expression has been studied in adults, but few studies have examined this in children. This study involved secondary analysis of data collected in the first year of a four-year investigation of the influence of selected physiological and psychological factors on blood pressure in children. The purpose of this study was to compare the state/trait anger and patterns of anger expression scores (anger out, anger suppression, and anger reflection/control) of third grade children who were enrolled in high intensity sports programs with those in low intensity sports programs or those not enrolled. The following research questions were addressed: What are the differences in anger and patterns of anger expression scores between children enrolled in high intensity sports programs and those not enrolled; and What are gender or ethnic differences in anger and patterns of anger expression scores in children enrolled in high intensity sports programs versus those not enrolled? From five elementary schools in a large southeastern school district, the original sample of 230 children were enrolled based on consent of parent/guardian and child, being able to read and understand English and parental completion of survey. After parents had completed an investigator prepared Health History and General Information Survey, participants completed the Jacobs Pediatric Anger Scale and the Jacobs Pediatric Anger Expression Scale. One hundred ninety eight participants completed information about participation in organized sports. One hundred nineteen (49.6%) participated and 79(32.9%) did not participate in organized sports. There were significantly lower mean Trait Anger scores and mean Anger Out scores in those who participated than those who didn't. When participants were grouped according to high intensity and low intensity or no involvement and analyzed by gender and/or race, significant differences in State and Trait Anger scores were found between Black and White participants. Additionally, females and White participants had significantly higher mean Anger Reflection/Control scores; Black participants had significantly higher mean Anger Out scores. When the interaction of race and intensity of activity was considered, White participants in high intensity sports programs had significantly higher Anger Reflection/Control scores. Anger and anger expression in children may be influenced by participation in sports programs and the intensity of those programs. If findings are verified by further research, high activity sports may be viewed as an effective means of dealing with anger in children and may further reduce the incidence of anger related diseases.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:15Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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