Health Promoting Behavioral Outcomes Of Exercise Education Intervention In Diabetics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166105
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promoting Behavioral Outcomes Of Exercise Education Intervention In Diabetics
Author(s):
Wisnewski, Charlotte
Author Details:
Charlotte Wisnewski, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: cwisnews@utmb.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this quasi- experimental study was to investigate the differences in exercise behavior outcomes between two groups of adult diabetics who attended traditional versus health promotion based exercise education programs. Using the Pender Health Promotion Model, the content of the one-hour experimental educational program was enhanced with health promotion principles. The control group received a traditional based one-hour exercise program. The volunteer sample (n=95) was recruited from diabetic education support group classes at four hospitals in a large Southwestern city. Both the experimental and the control groups were similar as to age, race, educational level, type of diabetes, and use or nonuse of insulin. The experimental group had a higher percentage of females than the control group. Two groups were randomly assigned to the experimental group and two to the control group. Using a pretest, post-test design, the variables measured were health promotion behavior (Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile -HPLP), exercise behavior (Physical Functioning subscale of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Health Survey), and a one-item question on exercise behavior change designed to elicit actual current exercise behavior. Post-test scores for each group were compared with pretest scores after the hour educational session. HPLP exercise subscale scores were analyzed using T-test to determine differences in the decision to engage in exercise behavior. Both the experimental group (t=-3.30, df=45, p
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promoting Behavioral Outcomes Of Exercise Education Intervention In Diabeticsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWisnewski, Charlotteen_US
dc.author.detailsCharlotte Wisnewski, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: cwisnews@utmb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166105-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this quasi- experimental study was to investigate the differences in exercise behavior outcomes between two groups of adult diabetics who attended traditional versus health promotion based exercise education programs. Using the Pender Health Promotion Model, the content of the one-hour experimental educational program was enhanced with health promotion principles. The control group received a traditional based one-hour exercise program. The volunteer sample (n=95) was recruited from diabetic education support group classes at four hospitals in a large Southwestern city. Both the experimental and the control groups were similar as to age, race, educational level, type of diabetes, and use or nonuse of insulin. The experimental group had a higher percentage of females than the control group. Two groups were randomly assigned to the experimental group and two to the control group. Using a pretest, post-test design, the variables measured were health promotion behavior (Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile -HPLP), exercise behavior (Physical Functioning subscale of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Health Survey), and a one-item question on exercise behavior change designed to elicit actual current exercise behavior. Post-test scores for each group were compared with pretest scores after the hour educational session. HPLP exercise subscale scores were analyzed using T-test to determine differences in the decision to engage in exercise behavior. Both the experimental group (t=-3.30, df=45, p<O.002) and the control groups (t=-4.73, df=42, p<0.001) increased exercise subscale scores a month after the educational intervention despite the experimental approach being based on health promotion and the other approach based on the traditional method of education. Exercise change scores were analyzed with A-NOVA and significantly higher scores were found in the experimental group (F=3.708, df=1, p<0.05). The results indicate that for this sample, education significantly increases exercise behavior in diabetics regardless of the teaching approach. However, further testing is needed to determine if a health promotion approach has more long-term effectiveness than the traditional method of exercise education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:17Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.