2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166107
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mexican-American Women's Health Ideas
Author(s):
Sanchez, Sandy
Author Details:
Sandy Sanchez, PhD, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, USA email: ssanchez@panam.edu
Abstract:
Mexican-Americans (MAs) are the largest Hispanic subgroup, comprising approximately five percent of the total U. S. population. Yet little is known about MA health, especially their lay wellness beliefs and behaviors. Since beliefs guide behaviors and since women are the lay guardians of health, this paper presents data obtained from 15 MA women via multiple in-depth ethnographic interviews that describe MA women's health ideas. Data reported are part of a broader study of MA women. A descriptive exploratory design using intensive ethnographic interviewing was employed to discover MA women's health ideas. Purposive sampling enlisted five families representing a 3-generation bloodline (grandmother-mother-daughter) into the study, which took place in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Demographic data, field notes, serendipitous participant observation, and acculturation scores supplemented the women's interviews and the investigator's insight. Multiple open-ended face-to-face ethnographic interviews were conducted over a 2-year period using both inductively and deductively derived questions. Both individual and family interviews were offered in each woman's preferred language and location, were audiotaped, and were transcribed verbatim. Ongoing inductive data analysis involved techniques of content analysis and constant comparison to facilitate the emergence of meanings from the MA women's words. Their health ideas were rich, personal, and upbeat with an overarching cross-generational health definition of feeling good all over, a personal sense of mind-body-spirit harmony that could be experienced even in the presence of pain or infirmity. Harmony was multifaceted and included interwoven physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual dimensions that, taken together, contributed to each woman's perception of holistic wellbeing. Harmony provided an energized body, a positive state of mind, and an inner strength that allowed each woman to accomplish her personal goals. Myriad personal, spiritual, and behavioral health enhancers that facilitated harmony were also inducted from the women s words. By far, the most striking health enhancer was the woman herself who emerged as her own primary health expert because of her strength, positive mind-set, humor, and faith. Each woman accepted personal responsibility for her own and her family's health, each believing she could e harmony by her own attitude, beliefs, and behaviors. Her family members also served as integral health enhancers. The MA women's personal views of health were in keeping with those presented in the nursing literature for mainstream, non-ethnic groups, dispelling some of the stereotypical images of MA women as passive, fatalistic, and submissive. Findings from this naturalistic study contribute to nursing's body of knowledge on MA women with implications for nursing research, practice, and education related to the incorporation of lay health ideas into relevant, holistic, and culturally congruent care plans.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMexican-American Women's Health Ideasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Sandyen_US
dc.author.detailsSandy Sanchez, PhD, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas, USA email: ssanchez@panam.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166107-
dc.description.abstractMexican-Americans (MAs) are the largest Hispanic subgroup, comprising approximately five percent of the total U. S. population. Yet little is known about MA health, especially their lay wellness beliefs and behaviors. Since beliefs guide behaviors and since women are the lay guardians of health, this paper presents data obtained from 15 MA women via multiple in-depth ethnographic interviews that describe MA women's health ideas. Data reported are part of a broader study of MA women. A descriptive exploratory design using intensive ethnographic interviewing was employed to discover MA women's health ideas. Purposive sampling enlisted five families representing a 3-generation bloodline (grandmother-mother-daughter) into the study, which took place in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Demographic data, field notes, serendipitous participant observation, and acculturation scores supplemented the women's interviews and the investigator's insight. Multiple open-ended face-to-face ethnographic interviews were conducted over a 2-year period using both inductively and deductively derived questions. Both individual and family interviews were offered in each woman's preferred language and location, were audiotaped, and were transcribed verbatim. Ongoing inductive data analysis involved techniques of content analysis and constant comparison to facilitate the emergence of meanings from the MA women's words. Their health ideas were rich, personal, and upbeat with an overarching cross-generational health definition of feeling good all over, a personal sense of mind-body-spirit harmony that could be experienced even in the presence of pain or infirmity. Harmony was multifaceted and included interwoven physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual dimensions that, taken together, contributed to each woman's perception of holistic wellbeing. Harmony provided an energized body, a positive state of mind, and an inner strength that allowed each woman to accomplish her personal goals. Myriad personal, spiritual, and behavioral health enhancers that facilitated harmony were also inducted from the women s words. By far, the most striking health enhancer was the woman herself who emerged as her own primary health expert because of her strength, positive mind-set, humor, and faith. Each woman accepted personal responsibility for her own and her family's health, each believing she could e harmony by her own attitude, beliefs, and behaviors. Her family members also served as integral health enhancers. The MA women's personal views of health were in keeping with those presented in the nursing literature for mainstream, non-ethnic groups, dispelling some of the stereotypical images of MA women as passive, fatalistic, and submissive. Findings from this naturalistic study contribute to nursing's body of knowledge on MA women with implications for nursing research, practice, and education related to the incorporation of lay health ideas into relevant, holistic, and culturally congruent care plans.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:20Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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