2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166113
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns In Nurse Supervisors Staffing Decisions
Author(s):
Layman, Eve
Author Details:
Eve Layman, MA/AM, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Eve.Layman@tamucc.edu
Abstract:
Nurses responsible for managing nursing care for groups of patients have long recognized that patients require varying amounts of nursing care depending on the severity of their health care problems and their degree of dependence on nurses. Assisting patients to improve or adjust to their current health state requires nurses spend time with patients in the provision of essential care. If patients are to achieve optimal benefits from nursing care, nursing time must be apportioned among individual members of patient groups such that each patient receives quality nursing care. A critical role for nurse managers in hospitals is to generate staff configurations consisting of adequate numbers of personnel and skill mix that result in sufficient time for staff on a unit to meet patient care requirements. These managerial decisions can be based on the nurse managers subjective professional assessments of each unit's nursing requirements or prescribed by formulas embedded formal staffing systems. Because decisions based on clinical judgment are often viewed by hospital administrators as too subjective, a tension between administrators and nursing staff has evolved as administrators have increasingly relied on formalized data systems and less on nursing judgment to support staff budgets (Finnigan, 1993; Shaha & Bush, 1992). The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the results of a descriptive qualitative study conducted as a portion of a larger study to identify patterns present in nursing supervisors staffing decisions. Clarification of the decision-making process used by nurses responsible for allocating staff may provide insight into professional clinical judgment useful in reducing tension between administrators and staff. Nine experienced nurses responsible for allocating nursing personnel to units within specific hospital services for multiple shifts were interviewed using a non-structured format. These supervisors work in a tertiary hospital where no standardized PCS is currently available to inform their decisions. Each participant was asked to describe the process they use when making staffing decisions for their service. Their interviews were transcribed literally, and analyzed to identify themes reflecting decision-making patterns. Several themes emerged from the thematic analysis indicative of a decision-making pattern among the participants. The critical initial step in determining appropriate staff configurations in any time period is information gathering. A variety of sources are used as informants; because information is temporally bound, the primary sources of critical data are those nurses directly responsible for patients on each unit. Being visible helps the staff regard the staffing decisions as legitimate. Finally, knowledge of the staff and their individual capabilities is essential to matching staff with patient care requirements.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns In Nurse Supervisors Staffing Decisionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLayman, Eveen_US
dc.author.detailsEve Layman, MA/AM, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: Eve.Layman@tamucc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166113-
dc.description.abstractNurses responsible for managing nursing care for groups of patients have long recognized that patients require varying amounts of nursing care depending on the severity of their health care problems and their degree of dependence on nurses. Assisting patients to improve or adjust to their current health state requires nurses spend time with patients in the provision of essential care. If patients are to achieve optimal benefits from nursing care, nursing time must be apportioned among individual members of patient groups such that each patient receives quality nursing care. A critical role for nurse managers in hospitals is to generate staff configurations consisting of adequate numbers of personnel and skill mix that result in sufficient time for staff on a unit to meet patient care requirements. These managerial decisions can be based on the nurse managers subjective professional assessments of each unit's nursing requirements or prescribed by formulas embedded formal staffing systems. Because decisions based on clinical judgment are often viewed by hospital administrators as too subjective, a tension between administrators and nursing staff has evolved as administrators have increasingly relied on formalized data systems and less on nursing judgment to support staff budgets (Finnigan, 1993; Shaha & Bush, 1992). The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the results of a descriptive qualitative study conducted as a portion of a larger study to identify patterns present in nursing supervisors staffing decisions. Clarification of the decision-making process used by nurses responsible for allocating staff may provide insight into professional clinical judgment useful in reducing tension between administrators and staff. Nine experienced nurses responsible for allocating nursing personnel to units within specific hospital services for multiple shifts were interviewed using a non-structured format. These supervisors work in a tertiary hospital where no standardized PCS is currently available to inform their decisions. Each participant was asked to describe the process they use when making staffing decisions for their service. Their interviews were transcribed literally, and analyzed to identify themes reflecting decision-making patterns. Several themes emerged from the thematic analysis indicative of a decision-making pattern among the participants. The critical initial step in determining appropriate staff configurations in any time period is information gathering. A variety of sources are used as informants; because information is temporally bound, the primary sources of critical data are those nurses directly responsible for patients on each unit. Being visible helps the staff regard the staffing decisions as legitimate. Finally, knowledge of the staff and their individual capabilities is essential to matching staff with patient care requirements.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:27Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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