2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166115
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Practice Characteristics Which Increase Client Satisfaction
Author(s):
Salisbury, Michele
Author Details:
Michele Salisbury, PhD, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: Michele.Salisbury@mcmail.vandeerbilt.edu
Abstract:
Problem: In an increasingly competitive health care environment, nurse practitioners must develop practices which attract and retain clients. Therefore, it is important to know what characteristics of a practice enhance client satisfaction. Background: Patient satisfaction with care has become an important outcome indicator in health care settings. Although, in the past, patients have favorably rated nurse practitioner care, few studies provide information about the characteristics of a practice which contribute to satisfaction. Within this context, the relationship between the practitioner and the client has acquired heightened importance as a possible way to increase patient satisfaction. Conceptual framework: Within the context of the relationship that exists between provider and client, there is a locus of authority. Traditional providers have relied on an official authority. Nevertheless, within a nursing context, the practitioner should forge a relational authority in which authority and goals will be shared with the client. Method: Twenty-five clients of a women's health nurse practitioner and 25 clients of a nurse-midwife participated in a semi-structured telephone interview about their choice of and satisfaction with their providers. Mean age of the well-educated respondents was 33 and they had self-reported simple health problems. Content analysis of the recorded interviews revealed characteristics of the practice which attracted the study participants. Results: Five characteristics of the practice emerged from the data. Only one characteristic relied on official authority and that was that the practitioner was knowledgeable and well-informed. The other four--communication, valuing, collaboration and holism--hinged on the relational authority that had been developed between the practitioner and the client. Discussion:An over-riding theme that emerged was that the participants were most satisfied with a shared locus of authority which places worth on the contributions of the client to her own health. They had left practitioners who had official authority but who did not treat them as individuals beyond a clinical diagnosis. These nurse practitioners provided a combination of official and relational authority which contributed to satisfaction with them as providers and with their practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePractice Characteristics Which Increase Client Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalisbury, Micheleen_US
dc.author.detailsMichele Salisbury, PhD, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: Michele.Salisbury@mcmail.vandeerbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166115-
dc.description.abstractProblem: In an increasingly competitive health care environment, nurse practitioners must develop practices which attract and retain clients. Therefore, it is important to know what characteristics of a practice enhance client satisfaction. Background: Patient satisfaction with care has become an important outcome indicator in health care settings. Although, in the past, patients have favorably rated nurse practitioner care, few studies provide information about the characteristics of a practice which contribute to satisfaction. Within this context, the relationship between the practitioner and the client has acquired heightened importance as a possible way to increase patient satisfaction. Conceptual framework: Within the context of the relationship that exists between provider and client, there is a locus of authority. Traditional providers have relied on an official authority. Nevertheless, within a nursing context, the practitioner should forge a relational authority in which authority and goals will be shared with the client. Method: Twenty-five clients of a women's health nurse practitioner and 25 clients of a nurse-midwife participated in a semi-structured telephone interview about their choice of and satisfaction with their providers. Mean age of the well-educated respondents was 33 and they had self-reported simple health problems. Content analysis of the recorded interviews revealed characteristics of the practice which attracted the study participants. Results: Five characteristics of the practice emerged from the data. Only one characteristic relied on official authority and that was that the practitioner was knowledgeable and well-informed. The other four--communication, valuing, collaboration and holism--hinged on the relational authority that had been developed between the practitioner and the client. Discussion:An over-riding theme that emerged was that the participants were most satisfied with a shared locus of authority which places worth on the contributions of the client to her own health. They had left practitioners who had official authority but who did not treat them as individuals beyond a clinical diagnosis. These nurse practitioners provided a combination of official and relational authority which contributed to satisfaction with them as providers and with their practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:29Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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