Evaluation Of Family Caregiving Experience To Compare Three Mental Health Service Delivery Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166116
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation Of Family Caregiving Experience To Compare Three Mental Health Service Delivery Programs
Author(s):
Camann, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Camann, Kennesaw State University College of Health and Human Services, Kennesaw, Georgia, USA, email: mcamann@kennesaw.edu
Abstract:
In policy discourse, mental illness is often viewed by policy makers as something to be feared and ignored. Health policy does not adequately address family issues related to the delivery of appropriate and effective care to mentally ill persons. Family members have become caregivers by default, as treatment has moved into the community, but families are not considered in the assessment of treatment outcomes for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative effects of three approaches to mental health care; assertive case management, traditional case management and usual clinic based mental health care, on family caregivers and caregiving activities. The caregiving outcomes studied include subjective and objective ADL care, objective supervision, worry, objective impact, financial expenditure, as well as benefits and gratifications of caregiving of persons with serious and persistent mental illness. The second purpose was to assess the families' satisfactions with services for their family member. The study employed a quasi-experimental, control group design. Clients were randomly assigned to assertive case management, case management, or regular treatment, and designated caregiving family members. Family members participated in the study of the family experience. The sample consisted of 29 family caregivers who were designated by the randomly assigned clients and who consented to participate in an interview 12-18 months after the mentally ill person was entered into the treatment groups. Face-to-face interviews were conducted utilizing the Family Experience interview Schedule (FEIS) and the open ended questions concerning experiences with mental health services, satisfaction with care, and recommendations for services that they would find helpful. The goal of the study was to expand knowledge about family experience related to treatment of mentally ill family members. The study addressed the effects of different types of treatment on the family experience of caregiving, the effect of cc- residential status on the family perception of burden, and the degree of family satisfaction with service for their mentally ill family member related to type of treatment. The research was designed to assist policy makers, clinicians and administrators in decision making related to the provision of services that acknowledge and support family caregiving of the mentally ill, and the utility of assessment of the family experience in evaluation of program outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation Of Family Caregiving Experience To Compare Three Mental Health Service Delivery Programsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCamann, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Camann, Kennesaw State University College of Health and Human Services, Kennesaw, Georgia, USA, email: mcamann@kennesaw.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166116-
dc.description.abstractIn policy discourse, mental illness is often viewed by policy makers as something to be feared and ignored. Health policy does not adequately address family issues related to the delivery of appropriate and effective care to mentally ill persons. Family members have become caregivers by default, as treatment has moved into the community, but families are not considered in the assessment of treatment outcomes for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative effects of three approaches to mental health care; assertive case management, traditional case management and usual clinic based mental health care, on family caregivers and caregiving activities. The caregiving outcomes studied include subjective and objective ADL care, objective supervision, worry, objective impact, financial expenditure, as well as benefits and gratifications of caregiving of persons with serious and persistent mental illness. The second purpose was to assess the families' satisfactions with services for their family member. The study employed a quasi-experimental, control group design. Clients were randomly assigned to assertive case management, case management, or regular treatment, and designated caregiving family members. Family members participated in the study of the family experience. The sample consisted of 29 family caregivers who were designated by the randomly assigned clients and who consented to participate in an interview 12-18 months after the mentally ill person was entered into the treatment groups. Face-to-face interviews were conducted utilizing the Family Experience interview Schedule (FEIS) and the open ended questions concerning experiences with mental health services, satisfaction with care, and recommendations for services that they would find helpful. The goal of the study was to expand knowledge about family experience related to treatment of mentally ill family members. The study addressed the effects of different types of treatment on the family experience of caregiving, the effect of cc- residential status on the family perception of burden, and the degree of family satisfaction with service for their mentally ill family member related to type of treatment. The research was designed to assist policy makers, clinicians and administrators in decision making related to the provision of services that acknowledge and support family caregiving of the mentally ill, and the utility of assessment of the family experience in evaluation of program outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:31Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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