2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166123
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Health Promoting Behaviors Among University Employees
Author(s):
Harrison, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda Harrison, PhD, Professor, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: harrisol@son.uab.edu
Abstract:
The Health Promotion Model (HPM) (Pender, 1987) has provided useful direction to researchers and clinicians interested in understanding factors that influence health promoting behaviors. The Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) has been used by many researchers in testing the HPM. Results from this research have not been consistent, however, and there are still many aspects of this model that have not been tested. Few studies have examined HPLP scores among different levels of workers within a particular work setting (Lusk et al., 1995). The purpose of this study was to compare HPLP scores among faculty, staff, and administrators at a major state university. In addition, the study focused on testing the HPM by examining the relationships between HPLP scores, perceived value of health, perceived health competence, and selected demographic variables. Data collection instruments were mailed to a random sample of 175 faculty, 175 staff members, and 50 administrators, and a total of 200 questionnaires were returned (a 50% response rate). A descriptive correlational design was employed, and four data collection instruments were used: (a) the HPLP; (b) the Health Values Survey (HVS) developed by Wallston et al. (1976); (c) the Perceived Health Competence Scale (PHCS) (Smith, Wallston, and Smith, in press); and (d) an investigator developed demographic instrument. Internal consistency reliability in this study was .93 for the HPLP and .89 for the PHCS. Construct validity of the HPLP, the HVS, and the PHCS is suggested by empirical support from numerous studies which have used these instruments. Preliminary analyses of the data have been completed and final analysis will be complete by September, 1995. Participants ranked health as the highest of ten values in the HVS, and their mean HPLP total score was 2.7. Faculty members' rankings of perceived value of health were lower than those of staff members, but there was no relationship between job position and HPLP or PHCS scores. Females rankings of perceived value of health were higher than rankings by males, and females also had higher mean scores on the interpersonal support subscale of the HPLP than did males. Individuals who were divorced had significantly lower scores on the nutritional subscale of the HPLP than did married respondents. The paper will discuss implications of the findings for planning health promotion programs for university employees. Implications for future research will also be discussed in view of the relationship between the findings and the Health Promotion Model.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Health Promoting Behaviors Among University Employeesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda Harrison, PhD, Professor, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: harrisol@son.uab.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166123-
dc.description.abstractThe Health Promotion Model (HPM) (Pender, 1987) has provided useful direction to researchers and clinicians interested in understanding factors that influence health promoting behaviors. The Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) has been used by many researchers in testing the HPM. Results from this research have not been consistent, however, and there are still many aspects of this model that have not been tested. Few studies have examined HPLP scores among different levels of workers within a particular work setting (Lusk et al., 1995). The purpose of this study was to compare HPLP scores among faculty, staff, and administrators at a major state university. In addition, the study focused on testing the HPM by examining the relationships between HPLP scores, perceived value of health, perceived health competence, and selected demographic variables. Data collection instruments were mailed to a random sample of 175 faculty, 175 staff members, and 50 administrators, and a total of 200 questionnaires were returned (a 50% response rate). A descriptive correlational design was employed, and four data collection instruments were used: (a) the HPLP; (b) the Health Values Survey (HVS) developed by Wallston et al. (1976); (c) the Perceived Health Competence Scale (PHCS) (Smith, Wallston, and Smith, in press); and (d) an investigator developed demographic instrument. Internal consistency reliability in this study was .93 for the HPLP and .89 for the PHCS. Construct validity of the HPLP, the HVS, and the PHCS is suggested by empirical support from numerous studies which have used these instruments. Preliminary analyses of the data have been completed and final analysis will be complete by September, 1995. Participants ranked health as the highest of ten values in the HVS, and their mean HPLP total score was 2.7. Faculty members' rankings of perceived value of health were lower than those of staff members, but there was no relationship between job position and HPLP or PHCS scores. Females rankings of perceived value of health were higher than rankings by males, and females also had higher mean scores on the interpersonal support subscale of the HPLP than did males. Individuals who were divorced had significantly lower scores on the nutritional subscale of the HPLP than did married respondents. The paper will discuss implications of the findings for planning health promotion programs for university employees. Implications for future research will also be discussed in view of the relationship between the findings and the Health Promotion Model.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:40Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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