2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166124
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Trends in Staff RN Decisional Involvement: 1990 to 1994
Author(s):
Havens, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Havens, PhD, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: dhavens@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
The national trend to restructure and "rightsize" is changing nursing practice. How these changes affect professional nursing practice now and in the future is of great interest. Therefore, the purpose of this study, which built upon the investigator's 1990 work, was to examine the nature and extent of current and projected staff RN decisional involvement in matters related to the content and context of practice in acute care general hospitals. The literature on sociology of the professions and professional nursing practice models provided the theoretical base for this research. A cross-sectional mailed survey was used to collect data during the summer and fall of 1994 from a randomly selected sample of 600 acute general care hospitals across the country. Data were collected from two levels within organizations: chief nurse executives (CNEs) served as organizational informants and nurse managers from patient care units selected as the single most professional/ innovative/progressive unit within each hospital by the CNE, served as unit level informants. The two-step sampling method yielded 181 usable questionnaires from nurse managers (30%). Respondents represented hospitals of all sizes, types, and geographic regions in the country. Although 67% of the CNEs reported that unit level governance/structural changes had been implemented within the past two years, findings revealed that on most of these professional/innovative/ progressive reference units, staff RNs and administrators had not yet implemented a model in which they each contributed equally to governing nursing practice. In fact, for many of the 21 items on the Decisional Involvement Scale (Havens, 1990; 1994) staff RNs were less decisionally involved in 1994 than in 1990. This is most curious in light of the recent literature and the number of respondents who reported that they had or were about to implement various models of shared governance. In light of the literature which proposes environments which support professionals who work in organizations and the calls from several national studies for increased RN decisional involvement, these study findings hold importance for staff RNs and administrators as they invent practice for the future.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTrends in Staff RN Decisional Involvement: 1990 to 1994en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHavens, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Havens, PhD, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: dhavens@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166124-
dc.description.abstractThe national trend to restructure and "rightsize" is changing nursing practice. How these changes affect professional nursing practice now and in the future is of great interest. Therefore, the purpose of this study, which built upon the investigator's 1990 work, was to examine the nature and extent of current and projected staff RN decisional involvement in matters related to the content and context of practice in acute care general hospitals. The literature on sociology of the professions and professional nursing practice models provided the theoretical base for this research. A cross-sectional mailed survey was used to collect data during the summer and fall of 1994 from a randomly selected sample of 600 acute general care hospitals across the country. Data were collected from two levels within organizations: chief nurse executives (CNEs) served as organizational informants and nurse managers from patient care units selected as the single most professional/ innovative/progressive unit within each hospital by the CNE, served as unit level informants. The two-step sampling method yielded 181 usable questionnaires from nurse managers (30%). Respondents represented hospitals of all sizes, types, and geographic regions in the country. Although 67% of the CNEs reported that unit level governance/structural changes had been implemented within the past two years, findings revealed that on most of these professional/innovative/ progressive reference units, staff RNs and administrators had not yet implemented a model in which they each contributed equally to governing nursing practice. In fact, for many of the 21 items on the Decisional Involvement Scale (Havens, 1990; 1994) staff RNs were less decisionally involved in 1994 than in 1990. This is most curious in light of the recent literature and the number of respondents who reported that they had or were about to implement various models of shared governance. In light of the literature which proposes environments which support professionals who work in organizations and the calls from several national studies for increased RN decisional involvement, these study findings hold importance for staff RNs and administrators as they invent practice for the future.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:41Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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