2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166128
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Practice in Fever Management for AIDS Acute Care Patients
Author(s):
Jones, Sande
Author Details:
Sande Jones, PhD, Assistant Professor, Florida International University, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: joness@fiu.edu
Abstract:
Symptom management is an essential component of nursing care for persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). While the physician's role is curative, the nurse's role is to help maintain comfort and provide care and psychosocial support to the patient (O'Brien & Pheifer, 1993). Fever is a common but complex response of persons affected with HIV/AIDS (Minkoff, 1995; Septowitz, 1993). Although the nursing literature indicates a concern for fever treatment of AIDS patients, there is a lack of research in the effectiveness of nursing measures for fever management (Holtzclaw, 1992; Roberts, 1991). A Performance Improvement study on AIDS fever management conducted at a 707 bed South Florida urban teaching hospital indicated a need to investigate current nursing practice and implement a nursing practice guideline for fever management of AIDS patients. A descriptive, exploratory study was done to identify current nursing practice in fever management of a culturally diverse group of AIDS nurses on the Special Immunology Unit. Grossman's (1995) fever practice survey tool, a 7-item open-ended questionnaire, was used with permission and administered to the 20 nurses, along with group and one-on-one interviews. There was 100% participation; the nurses' responses and comments revealed that they routinely used nursing assessment and patients' perceptions to denote the onset of fever in AIDS patients. A unique phenomena was identified; the ability of AIDS patients to tell nurses that they were getting a fever; even though their temperature at the time was within a normal range. In many cases, within 15-30 minutes the patient's temperature would be elevated above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Nursing interventions during the febrile episode included applying cool compresses or ice packs to various parts of the body; adding or removing bed linen and clothes; encouraging oral intake, both cool and hot; and discouraging the use of hypothermia blankets due to patient's complaints of extreme discomfort. The study also revealed the effect of the nurses' cultural background as an influence in deciding which interventions to use. Concurrently, a study was done to collect data on the fever profile of the hospitalized AIDS patient. This study revealed that, regardless of the admission temperature, almost 3/4 of the AIDS patients admitted to the unit had at least one febrile episode (most had several) during hospitalization, which validated the need for a nursing practice guideline for AIDS fever care. The theoretical nursing model chosen was comfort care (Kolcaba, 1995). The selected goals of care were to attain or maintain patient comfort during the febrile episode; reduce febrile shivering; and maintain fluid and energy sources. The expected outcome of care was a decrease in patient body temperature along with an increase in comfort level. To determine patient comfort levels, a "faces" Visual Analog Scale was placed on all bedside clipboards. This enabled the nurses to easily ascertain the patient's perception of comfort before, during and after nursing and medical interventions for fever management. A research project is currently underway to evaulate the effectiveness of antipyretic therapy alone for AIDS fever management versus combining antipyretic therapy with nursing comfort cooling measures (both traditional and non-traditional).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Practice in Fever Management for AIDS Acute Care Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sandeen_US
dc.author.detailsSande Jones, PhD, Assistant Professor, Florida International University, North Miami, Florida, USA, email: joness@fiu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166128-
dc.description.abstractSymptom management is an essential component of nursing care for persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). While the physician's role is curative, the nurse's role is to help maintain comfort and provide care and psychosocial support to the patient (O'Brien & Pheifer, 1993). Fever is a common but complex response of persons affected with HIV/AIDS (Minkoff, 1995; Septowitz, 1993). Although the nursing literature indicates a concern for fever treatment of AIDS patients, there is a lack of research in the effectiveness of nursing measures for fever management (Holtzclaw, 1992; Roberts, 1991). A Performance Improvement study on AIDS fever management conducted at a 707 bed South Florida urban teaching hospital indicated a need to investigate current nursing practice and implement a nursing practice guideline for fever management of AIDS patients. A descriptive, exploratory study was done to identify current nursing practice in fever management of a culturally diverse group of AIDS nurses on the Special Immunology Unit. Grossman's (1995) fever practice survey tool, a 7-item open-ended questionnaire, was used with permission and administered to the 20 nurses, along with group and one-on-one interviews. There was 100% participation; the nurses' responses and comments revealed that they routinely used nursing assessment and patients' perceptions to denote the onset of fever in AIDS patients. A unique phenomena was identified; the ability of AIDS patients to tell nurses that they were getting a fever; even though their temperature at the time was within a normal range. In many cases, within 15-30 minutes the patient's temperature would be elevated above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Nursing interventions during the febrile episode included applying cool compresses or ice packs to various parts of the body; adding or removing bed linen and clothes; encouraging oral intake, both cool and hot; and discouraging the use of hypothermia blankets due to patient's complaints of extreme discomfort. The study also revealed the effect of the nurses' cultural background as an influence in deciding which interventions to use. Concurrently, a study was done to collect data on the fever profile of the hospitalized AIDS patient. This study revealed that, regardless of the admission temperature, almost 3/4 of the AIDS patients admitted to the unit had at least one febrile episode (most had several) during hospitalization, which validated the need for a nursing practice guideline for AIDS fever care. The theoretical nursing model chosen was comfort care (Kolcaba, 1995). The selected goals of care were to attain or maintain patient comfort during the febrile episode; reduce febrile shivering; and maintain fluid and energy sources. The expected outcome of care was a decrease in patient body temperature along with an increase in comfort level. To determine patient comfort levels, a "faces" Visual Analog Scale was placed on all bedside clipboards. This enabled the nurses to easily ascertain the patient's perception of comfort before, during and after nursing and medical interventions for fever management. A research project is currently underway to evaulate the effectiveness of antipyretic therapy alone for AIDS fever management versus combining antipyretic therapy with nursing comfort cooling measures (both traditional and non-traditional).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:46Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.