The Experience of Burnout in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses: An InterpretativeInteractionist Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166129
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Burnout in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses: An InterpretativeInteractionist Approach
Author(s):
Kearney, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Kearney, PhD, The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bkearney@murraystate.edu
Abstract:
This study investigated psychiatric nurses' lived experience of burnout while working in inpatient units in psychiatric hospitals. Interpretive interactionism was used to examine subjective interpretations of personal troubles and public issues. Twelve psychiatric nurses, who identified themselves as having suffered burnout were interviewed to capture thick description of their epiphany experiences. The sample included variations in gender, age, educational preparation, experience, and types of employing organizations. Bracketing the key phrases from nurses' thick descriptions resulted in the emergence of two major themes, victimization and coming to reality. The participants identified feeling victimized in, and by, their employing organizations by being discounted, set up for failure, and beaten down. Being discounted involved a reduction in benefits and having their professional input into decisions that impacted the patients and the milieu ignored. Being set up for failure involved being held accountable for the well-being of patients and the milieu without adequate resources to do the job. Being beaten down was the experience of being blamed, criticized, and reprimanded by supervisors and administrators for consequences of decisions over which they had no control. The second major theme that emerged, coming to reality was a process by which nurses broke through their denial systems and began to trust their own perceptions, thoughts and feelings. Three sub-themes that emerged were making a difference, making sense of senselessness, and making decisions. Making a difference involved nurses' self confidence in their personal power to influence patients in a positive manner. Making sense of senselessness involved developing a cognitive framework, or a rational explanation for what nurses saw and believed were irrational actions and decisions of administrators and supervisors. Making decisions involved a cognitive assessment of the costs and benefits of nurse's employment and determing what course of action was in their best interest. In contextualization, the themes of the experience of burnout were interpreted in the context of nursing and health care organizations. Nurses' experiences were compared to descriptions of types and consequences of emotional abuse. The comparison illustrated how nurses' burnout was experienced as emotional abuse inflicted in what they called dysfunctional organizations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Burnout in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses: An InterpretativeInteractionist Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Kearney, PhD, The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bkearney@murraystate.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166129-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated psychiatric nurses' lived experience of burnout while working in inpatient units in psychiatric hospitals. Interpretive interactionism was used to examine subjective interpretations of personal troubles and public issues. Twelve psychiatric nurses, who identified themselves as having suffered burnout were interviewed to capture thick description of their epiphany experiences. The sample included variations in gender, age, educational preparation, experience, and types of employing organizations. Bracketing the key phrases from nurses' thick descriptions resulted in the emergence of two major themes, victimization and coming to reality. The participants identified feeling victimized in, and by, their employing organizations by being discounted, set up for failure, and beaten down. Being discounted involved a reduction in benefits and having their professional input into decisions that impacted the patients and the milieu ignored. Being set up for failure involved being held accountable for the well-being of patients and the milieu without adequate resources to do the job. Being beaten down was the experience of being blamed, criticized, and reprimanded by supervisors and administrators for consequences of decisions over which they had no control. The second major theme that emerged, coming to reality was a process by which nurses broke through their denial systems and began to trust their own perceptions, thoughts and feelings. Three sub-themes that emerged were making a difference, making sense of senselessness, and making decisions. Making a difference involved nurses' self confidence in their personal power to influence patients in a positive manner. Making sense of senselessness involved developing a cognitive framework, or a rational explanation for what nurses saw and believed were irrational actions and decisions of administrators and supervisors. Making decisions involved a cognitive assessment of the costs and benefits of nurse's employment and determing what course of action was in their best interest. In contextualization, the themes of the experience of burnout were interpreted in the context of nursing and health care organizations. Nurses' experiences were compared to descriptions of types and consequences of emotional abuse. The comparison illustrated how nurses' burnout was experienced as emotional abuse inflicted in what they called dysfunctional organizations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:48Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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