2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166130
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of African American Women with Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Lackey, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Lackey, PhD, Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: Lackeyn@umkc.edu
Abstract:
African American women do not get breast cancer as frequently as Caucasian women,but have a higher mortality rate. Long (1993) has recommended exploration of psychosocial phenomena associated with delays in initiating and continuingtreatment for these women. There is little literature available that describesthe breast cancer experience of African American women during the initial diagnosis and treatment phases. The specific aim of this phenomenological studyis to chronicle the day-to-day life of African American women with breast cancer.The research question guiding the phenomenological interview is: What is the lived experience of breast cancer for African American women? The participants of this study are 12 women who meet the following criteria: (a) diagnosis ofbreast cancer, (b) receiving initial chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery, (c)three to six months post diagnosis, and (d) 34-75 years of-age. Using a purposive sample, one of the researchers selects the women meeting the criteria, explains the study, and seeks their permission. Participants are called and the interviews are scheduled at their convenience in their homes or location of their choice.The interviews are averaging 45 minutes in length. Procedures to assure confidentiality and anonymity are followed. The interviews are audiotaped and transcribed. The women receive monetary compensation for their time. Data are being analyzed using Colaizzi's method of analysis. Seven of the women have been interviewed to date and analysis will be completed by December, 1995. The women have been forthright and open in sharing their experiences. The collaboration ofthe disciplines of nursing and social work, as well as the combination of the practice-based and research-based expertise of the research team are viewed as positive influences in capturing the overall view of African American women'sexperiences of living day-to day with breast cancer. More complete understanding of African American women's experiences with breast cancer is expected to lead to improved nursing and social work interventions related to the women and their families during the breast cancer experience. Furthermore, the findings will serve as a stimulus for future studies of women dealing with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of African American Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLackey, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Lackey, PhD, Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: Lackeyn@umkc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166130-
dc.description.abstractAfrican American women do not get breast cancer as frequently as Caucasian women,but have a higher mortality rate. Long (1993) has recommended exploration of psychosocial phenomena associated with delays in initiating and continuingtreatment for these women. There is little literature available that describesthe breast cancer experience of African American women during the initial diagnosis and treatment phases. The specific aim of this phenomenological studyis to chronicle the day-to-day life of African American women with breast cancer.The research question guiding the phenomenological interview is: What is the lived experience of breast cancer for African American women? The participants of this study are 12 women who meet the following criteria: (a) diagnosis ofbreast cancer, (b) receiving initial chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery, (c)three to six months post diagnosis, and (d) 34-75 years of-age. Using a purposive sample, one of the researchers selects the women meeting the criteria, explains the study, and seeks their permission. Participants are called and the interviews are scheduled at their convenience in their homes or location of their choice.The interviews are averaging 45 minutes in length. Procedures to assure confidentiality and anonymity are followed. The interviews are audiotaped and transcribed. The women receive monetary compensation for their time. Data are being analyzed using Colaizzi's method of analysis. Seven of the women have been interviewed to date and analysis will be completed by December, 1995. The women have been forthright and open in sharing their experiences. The collaboration ofthe disciplines of nursing and social work, as well as the combination of the practice-based and research-based expertise of the research team are viewed as positive influences in capturing the overall view of African American women'sexperiences of living day-to day with breast cancer. More complete understanding of African American women's experiences with breast cancer is expected to lead to improved nursing and social work interventions related to the women and their families during the breast cancer experience. Furthermore, the findings will serve as a stimulus for future studies of women dealing with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:49Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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