Perceived Effects of Social Disaffiliation on the Health of Two Groups ofHomeless Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166131
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Effects of Social Disaffiliation on the Health of Two Groups ofHomeless Men
Author(s):
Lafuente, Corazon
Author Details:
Corazon Lafuente, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor of Nursing, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, (updated February 2015) email: maria.lafuente@med.va.gov
Abstract:
This study was undertaken to describe and compare perceptions of the effects of social disaffiliation on the health of a group of 10 homeless men using a shelter for the homeless to those of a group of 10 homeless men using a clinic for the homeless. Phenomenology served as both the design and framework of the study. Phenomenology (Omery, 1983) is the way in which the objective and subjective experiences of the participants are described. The data previously gathered from the two groups of homeless men were used and analyzed to address this study question: "How do two groups of homeless men differ in their perceptions of the effects of social disaffiliation on their health?" The 20 respondents were selected to participate in the study if they were (a) homeless men between the ages of 18 and 75 years old, (b) using either a shelter or a clinic for the homeless located in one of the two urban areas in the southern part of the United States, (c) fluent in English, and (d) free from the influence of any drugs at the time of audiotaped interview. Analysis of information given by each group of participants used the steps in phenomenology suggested by Giorgi (cited in Omery, 1983). Analysis of data allowed for comparison between the perceptions of the groups. The themes of uncertainty, rejection, and social isolation were prevalent in both groups' description of their experiences. The themes of depersonalization, discrimination, and hopefulness were experienced by the group of homeless men using the clinic for the homeless. Study findings can provide nurses and other health care providers more insight into the effects of homelessness on the health of homeless men. The findings can also help nurses and others design ways in which to improve care for this group of population, which may, in turn, help the homeless reintegrate into the societal mainstream.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Effects of Social Disaffiliation on the Health of Two Groups ofHomeless Menen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLafuente, Corazonen_US
dc.author.detailsCorazon Lafuente, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor of Nursing, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Nursing, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, (updated February 2015) email: maria.lafuente@med.va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166131-
dc.description.abstractThis study was undertaken to describe and compare perceptions of the effects of social disaffiliation on the health of a group of 10 homeless men using a shelter for the homeless to those of a group of 10 homeless men using a clinic for the homeless. Phenomenology served as both the design and framework of the study. Phenomenology (Omery, 1983) is the way in which the objective and subjective experiences of the participants are described. The data previously gathered from the two groups of homeless men were used and analyzed to address this study question: "How do two groups of homeless men differ in their perceptions of the effects of social disaffiliation on their health?" The 20 respondents were selected to participate in the study if they were (a) homeless men between the ages of 18 and 75 years old, (b) using either a shelter or a clinic for the homeless located in one of the two urban areas in the southern part of the United States, (c) fluent in English, and (d) free from the influence of any drugs at the time of audiotaped interview. Analysis of information given by each group of participants used the steps in phenomenology suggested by Giorgi (cited in Omery, 1983). Analysis of data allowed for comparison between the perceptions of the groups. The themes of uncertainty, rejection, and social isolation were prevalent in both groups' description of their experiences. The themes of depersonalization, discrimination, and hopefulness were experienced by the group of homeless men using the clinic for the homeless. Study findings can provide nurses and other health care providers more insight into the effects of homelessness on the health of homeless men. The findings can also help nurses and others design ways in which to improve care for this group of population, which may, in turn, help the homeless reintegrate into the societal mainstream.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:40:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:40:50Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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